Food Access, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Hypertension in the U.S.

Jonathan J. Suarez, Tamara Isakova, Cheryl A M Anderson, Leigh Boulware, Myles Wolf, Julia J. Scialla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Greater distance to full-service supermarkets and low income may impair access to healthy diets and contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension. The study aim was to determine relationships among residence in a "food desert," low income, CKD, and blood pressure. Methods Adults in the 2003-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (N=22,173) were linked to food desert data (www.ers.usda.gov) by Census Tracts. Food deserts have low median income and are further from a supermarket or large grocery store (>1 mile in urban areas, >10 miles in rural areas). Weighted regression was used to determine the association of residence in a food desert and family income with dietary intake; systolic blood pressure (SBP); and odds of CKD. Data analysis was performed in 2014-2015. Results Compared with those not in food deserts, participants residing in food deserts had lower levels of serum carotenoids (p3, 95% CI=1.12, 2.89), but also greater odds of CKD (OR=1.76 for income-poverty ratio ≤1 vs >3, 95% CI=1.48, 2.10). Conclusions Limited access to healthy food due to geographic or financial barriers could be targeted for prevention of CKD and hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-920
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Hypertension
Food
Blood Pressure
Nutrition Surveys
Censuses
Carotenoids
Poverty
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Food Access, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Hypertension in the U.S. / Suarez, Jonathan J.; Isakova, Tamara; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Boulware, Leigh; Wolf, Myles; Scialla, Julia J.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 912-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suarez, Jonathan J. ; Isakova, Tamara ; Anderson, Cheryl A M ; Boulware, Leigh ; Wolf, Myles ; Scialla, Julia J. / Food Access, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Hypertension in the U.S. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 912-920.
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