Fluoroquinolones, tuberculosis, and resistance

Amy Sarah Ginsburg, Jacques H. Grosset, William Ramses Bishai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although the fluoroquinolones are presently used to treat tuberculosis primarily in cases involving resistance or intolerance to first-line antituberculosis therapy, these drugs are potential first-line agents and are under study for this indication. However, there is concern about the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly when administered as monotherapy or as the only active agent in a failing multidrug regimen. Treatment failures as well as relapses have been documented under such conditions. With increasing numbers of fluoroquinolone prescriptions and the expanded use of these broad-spectrum agents for many infections, the selective pressure of fluoroquinolone use results in the ready emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in a diversity of organisms, including M tuberculosis. Among M tuberculosis, resistance is emerging and may herald a significant future threat to the long-term clinical utility of fluoroquinolones. Discussion and education regarding appropriate use are necessary to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic class against the hazard of growing resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-442
Number of pages11
JournalLancet Infectious Diseases
Volume3
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

Fingerprint

Fluoroquinolones
Tuberculosis
Treatment Failure
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Prescriptions
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Education
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Fluoroquinolones, tuberculosis, and resistance. / Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Grosset, Jacques H.; Bishai, William Ramses.

In: Lancet Infectious Diseases, Vol. 3, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 432-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ginsburg, Amy Sarah ; Grosset, Jacques H. ; Bishai, William Ramses. / Fluoroquinolones, tuberculosis, and resistance. In: Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 7. pp. 432-442.
@article{682600ba8dfd4d25b3c658fbffad3907,
title = "Fluoroquinolones, tuberculosis, and resistance",
abstract = "Although the fluoroquinolones are presently used to treat tuberculosis primarily in cases involving resistance or intolerance to first-line antituberculosis therapy, these drugs are potential first-line agents and are under study for this indication. However, there is concern about the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly when administered as monotherapy or as the only active agent in a failing multidrug regimen. Treatment failures as well as relapses have been documented under such conditions. With increasing numbers of fluoroquinolone prescriptions and the expanded use of these broad-spectrum agents for many infections, the selective pressure of fluoroquinolone use results in the ready emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in a diversity of organisms, including M tuberculosis. Among M tuberculosis, resistance is emerging and may herald a significant future threat to the long-term clinical utility of fluoroquinolones. Discussion and education regarding appropriate use are necessary to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic class against the hazard of growing resistance.",
author = "Ginsburg, {Amy Sarah} and Grosset, {Jacques H.} and Bishai, {William Ramses}",
year = "2003",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1473-3099(03)00671-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "432--442",
journal = "The Lancet Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1473-3099",
publisher = "Lancet Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fluoroquinolones, tuberculosis, and resistance

AU - Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

AU - Grosset, Jacques H.

AU - Bishai, William Ramses

PY - 2003/7/1

Y1 - 2003/7/1

N2 - Although the fluoroquinolones are presently used to treat tuberculosis primarily in cases involving resistance or intolerance to first-line antituberculosis therapy, these drugs are potential first-line agents and are under study for this indication. However, there is concern about the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly when administered as monotherapy or as the only active agent in a failing multidrug regimen. Treatment failures as well as relapses have been documented under such conditions. With increasing numbers of fluoroquinolone prescriptions and the expanded use of these broad-spectrum agents for many infections, the selective pressure of fluoroquinolone use results in the ready emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in a diversity of organisms, including M tuberculosis. Among M tuberculosis, resistance is emerging and may herald a significant future threat to the long-term clinical utility of fluoroquinolones. Discussion and education regarding appropriate use are necessary to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic class against the hazard of growing resistance.

AB - Although the fluoroquinolones are presently used to treat tuberculosis primarily in cases involving resistance or intolerance to first-line antituberculosis therapy, these drugs are potential first-line agents and are under study for this indication. However, there is concern about the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly when administered as monotherapy or as the only active agent in a failing multidrug regimen. Treatment failures as well as relapses have been documented under such conditions. With increasing numbers of fluoroquinolone prescriptions and the expanded use of these broad-spectrum agents for many infections, the selective pressure of fluoroquinolone use results in the ready emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in a diversity of organisms, including M tuberculosis. Among M tuberculosis, resistance is emerging and may herald a significant future threat to the long-term clinical utility of fluoroquinolones. Discussion and education regarding appropriate use are necessary to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic class against the hazard of growing resistance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038788963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038788963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1473-3099(03)00671-6

DO - 10.1016/S1473-3099(03)00671-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 12837348

AN - SCOPUS:0038788963

VL - 3

SP - 432

EP - 442

JO - The Lancet Infectious Diseases

JF - The Lancet Infectious Diseases

SN - 1473-3099

IS - 7

ER -