Fluorescence-force spectroscopy maps two-dimensional reaction landscape of the holliday junction

Sungchul Hohng, Ruobo Zhou, Michelle K. Nahas, Jin Yu, Klaus Schulten, David M J Lilley, Taekjip Ha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite the recent advances in single-molecule manipulation techniques, purely mechanical approaches cannot detect subtle conformational changes in the biologically important regime of weak forces. We developed a hybrid scheme combining force and fluorescence that allowed us to examine the effect of subpiconewton forces on the nanometer scale motion of the Holliday junction (HJ) at 100-hertz bandwidth. The HJ is an exquisitely sensitive force sensor whose force response is amplified with an increase in its arm lengths, demonstrating a lever-arm effect at the nanometer-length scale. Mechanical interrogation of the HJ in three different directions helped elucidate the structures of the transient species populated during its conformational changes. This method of mapping two-dimensional reaction landscapes at low forces is readily applicable to other nucleic acid systems and their interactions with proteins and enzymes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-283
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume318
Issue number5848
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Cruciform DNA
Fluorescence Spectrometry
Nucleic Acids
Fluorescence
Enzymes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • General

Cite this

Hohng, S., Zhou, R., Nahas, M. K., Yu, J., Schulten, K., Lilley, D. M. J., & Ha, T. (2007). Fluorescence-force spectroscopy maps two-dimensional reaction landscape of the holliday junction. Science, 318(5848), 279-283. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1146113

Fluorescence-force spectroscopy maps two-dimensional reaction landscape of the holliday junction. / Hohng, Sungchul; Zhou, Ruobo; Nahas, Michelle K.; Yu, Jin; Schulten, Klaus; Lilley, David M J; Ha, Taekjip.

In: Science, Vol. 318, No. 5848, 12.10.2007, p. 279-283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hohng, S, Zhou, R, Nahas, MK, Yu, J, Schulten, K, Lilley, DMJ & Ha, T 2007, 'Fluorescence-force spectroscopy maps two-dimensional reaction landscape of the holliday junction', Science, vol. 318, no. 5848, pp. 279-283. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1146113
Hohng S, Zhou R, Nahas MK, Yu J, Schulten K, Lilley DMJ et al. Fluorescence-force spectroscopy maps two-dimensional reaction landscape of the holliday junction. Science. 2007 Oct 12;318(5848):279-283. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1146113
Hohng, Sungchul ; Zhou, Ruobo ; Nahas, Michelle K. ; Yu, Jin ; Schulten, Klaus ; Lilley, David M J ; Ha, Taekjip. / Fluorescence-force spectroscopy maps two-dimensional reaction landscape of the holliday junction. In: Science. 2007 ; Vol. 318, No. 5848. pp. 279-283.
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