Flow cytometric quantitation of T cell phenotypes in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of homosexual men with and without antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, type I

Joseph B. Margolick, Justin C. McArthur, Elvia R. Scott, Julie H. McArthur, Sylvia Cohn, Homayoon Farzadegan, B. Frank Polk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two-color flow cytometry was used to analyze T cell subsets (total (CD3), helper-inducer (CD4), and suppressor-cytotoxic (CD8)) in paired specimens of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood of 66 homosexual men, including 62 with antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1). With the exception of one traumatic specimen, all of the CSF specimens, 52 of which had ≤ 5 lymphocytes/mm3, were evaluated fully, with the number of lymphocytes counted for each antibody ranging from 200 to 2933 (mean=1129). Proportions of CD3, CD4, and CD8 lymphocytes in CSG were very highly correlated with the proportions of these cells in the peripheral blood (r=0.87, 0.96, and 0.94, respectively), as was the CD4/CD8 ratio (r=0.98). These strong correlations were present in each of seven subgroups of study subjects defined on the basis of detailed neurologic examination, neuropsychological testing, and the presence or absence of antibodies to HIV-1. In the population studied, T cell phenotypes in CSF as analyzed by two-color flow cytometry were largely determined by the corresponding proportions in the peripheral blood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-81
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1988
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • (Cerebrospinal fluid)
  • (Flow cytometry)
  • Helper T cell
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Suppressor T cell
  • T cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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