First premarital cohabitation in the United States: 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth.

Casey E. Copen, Kimberly Daniels, William D. Mosher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This report provides an updated description of trends and patterns in first premarital cohabitations among women aged 15-44 in the United States using the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Trends in pregnancies within first premarital cohabiting unions and differences by Hispanic origin and race, and education are also presented. Data for 2006-2010 were collected through in-person interviews with 22,682 women and men aged 15-44 in the household population of the United States. This report is based primarily on the sample of 12,279 women interviewed in 2006-2010, and is supplemented by data from the 1995 and 2002 NSFGs. Forty-eight percent of women interviewed in 2006-2010 cohabited with a partner as a first union, compared with 34% of women in 1995. Between 1995 and 2006-2010, the percentage of women who cohabited as a first union increased for all Hispanic origin and race groups, except for Asian women. In 2006-2010, 70% of women with less than a high school diploma cohabited as a first union, compared with 47% of women with a bachelor's degree or higher. First premarital cohabitations were longest for foreign-born Hispanic women (33 months) and shortest for white women (19 months). In 2006-2010, 40% of first premarital cohabitations among women transitioned to marriage by 3 years, 32% remained intact, and 27% dissolved. Nearly 20% of women experienced a pregnancy in the first year of their first premarital cohabitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15, 1 p following 15
JournalNational Health Statistics Reports
Issue number64
StatePublished - Apr 4 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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