Firearm injuries and children: Position statement of the American pediatric surgical association

APSA Board of Governors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Firearm injuries are the second most common cause of death in children who come to a trauma center, and pediatric surgeons provide crucial care for these patients. The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) is committed to comprehensive pediatric trauma readiness, including firearm injury prevention. The APSA supports a public health approach to firearm injury, and it supports availability of quality mental health services. The APSA endorses policies for universal background checks, restrictions on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, strong child access protection laws, and a minimum purchase age of 21 years. The APSA opposes efforts to keep physicians from counseling children and families about firearms. The APSA promotes research to address this problem, including increased federal research support and research into the second victim phenomenon. The ASPA supports school safety and readiness, including bleeding control training. Although it may be daunting to try to reduce firearm deaths in children, the United States has seen success in reducing motor vehicle deaths through a multidimensional approach: prevention, design, policy, behavior, and trauma care. The ASPA believes that a similar public health approach can succeed in saving children from death and injury from firearms. The ASPA is committed to building partnerships to accomplish this.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20183058
JournalPediatrics
Volume144
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Firearms
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Public Health
Weapons
Trauma Centers
Mental Health Services
Motor Vehicles
Research
Counseling
Cause of Death
Patient Care
Hemorrhage
Physicians
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Firearm injuries and children : Position statement of the American pediatric surgical association. / APSA Board of Governors.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 144, No. 1, e20183058, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a3c35ac70e4e4050a773e90ac0df205e,
title = "Firearm injuries and children: Position statement of the American pediatric surgical association",
abstract = "Firearm injuries are the second most common cause of death in children who come to a trauma center, and pediatric surgeons provide crucial care for these patients. The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) is committed to comprehensive pediatric trauma readiness, including firearm injury prevention. The APSA supports a public health approach to firearm injury, and it supports availability of quality mental health services. The APSA endorses policies for universal background checks, restrictions on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, strong child access protection laws, and a minimum purchase age of 21 years. The APSA opposes efforts to keep physicians from counseling children and families about firearms. The APSA promotes research to address this problem, including increased federal research support and research into the second victim phenomenon. The ASPA supports school safety and readiness, including bleeding control training. Although it may be daunting to try to reduce firearm deaths in children, the United States has seen success in reducing motor vehicle deaths through a multidimensional approach: prevention, design, policy, behavior, and trauma care. The ASPA believes that a similar public health approach can succeed in saving children from death and injury from firearms. The ASPA is committed to building partnerships to accomplish this.",
author = "{APSA Board of Governors} and Petty, {John K.} and Henry, {Marion C.W.} and Nance, {Michael L.} and Ford, {Henri R.} and Jeff Upperman and Reto Baertschiger and Amina Bhatia and Emily Christison-Lagay and Duane Duke and Vincent Duron and Mauricio Escobar and David Gibbs and Harsh Grewal and Brian Gulack and Ramin Jamshidi and Aaron Jensen and Shawn Larson and Robert Letton and Jessica Naiditch and Bindi Naik-Mathuria and Isam Nasr and Mitchell Price and Jose Prince and Carmen Ramos and Robert Russell and Anthony Stallion and Jacob Stephenson and Dylan Stewart and Adam Vogel and Kim Wallenstein and Regan Williams and Kathryn Bass and David Bliss and Mike Chen and Brian Coakley and Cynthia Downard and Audry Durrant and Mary Hilfiker and Leslie Knod and Julius Lister and Duncan Phillips and Kimberly Ruscher and Mary Fallat and Max Langham and Chuck Vinocur and Patrick Bailey and Hirschl, {Ronald B.} and Vacanti, {Joseph P.} and Michael Chen and Gail Besner",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2018-3058",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "144",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Firearm injuries and children

T2 - Position statement of the American pediatric surgical association

AU - APSA Board of Governors

AU - Petty, John K.

AU - Henry, Marion C.W.

AU - Nance, Michael L.

AU - Ford, Henri R.

AU - Upperman, Jeff

AU - Baertschiger, Reto

AU - Bhatia, Amina

AU - Christison-Lagay, Emily

AU - Duke, Duane

AU - Duron, Vincent

AU - Escobar, Mauricio

AU - Gibbs, David

AU - Grewal, Harsh

AU - Gulack, Brian

AU - Jamshidi, Ramin

AU - Jensen, Aaron

AU - Larson, Shawn

AU - Letton, Robert

AU - Naiditch, Jessica

AU - Naik-Mathuria, Bindi

AU - Nasr, Isam

AU - Price, Mitchell

AU - Prince, Jose

AU - Ramos, Carmen

AU - Russell, Robert

AU - Stallion, Anthony

AU - Stephenson, Jacob

AU - Stewart, Dylan

AU - Vogel, Adam

AU - Wallenstein, Kim

AU - Williams, Regan

AU - Bass, Kathryn

AU - Bliss, David

AU - Chen, Mike

AU - Coakley, Brian

AU - Downard, Cynthia

AU - Durrant, Audry

AU - Hilfiker, Mary

AU - Knod, Leslie

AU - Lister, Julius

AU - Phillips, Duncan

AU - Ruscher, Kimberly

AU - Fallat, Mary

AU - Langham, Max

AU - Vinocur, Chuck

AU - Bailey, Patrick

AU - Hirschl, Ronald B.

AU - Vacanti, Joseph P.

AU - Chen, Michael

AU - Besner, Gail

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Firearm injuries are the second most common cause of death in children who come to a trauma center, and pediatric surgeons provide crucial care for these patients. The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) is committed to comprehensive pediatric trauma readiness, including firearm injury prevention. The APSA supports a public health approach to firearm injury, and it supports availability of quality mental health services. The APSA endorses policies for universal background checks, restrictions on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, strong child access protection laws, and a minimum purchase age of 21 years. The APSA opposes efforts to keep physicians from counseling children and families about firearms. The APSA promotes research to address this problem, including increased federal research support and research into the second victim phenomenon. The ASPA supports school safety and readiness, including bleeding control training. Although it may be daunting to try to reduce firearm deaths in children, the United States has seen success in reducing motor vehicle deaths through a multidimensional approach: prevention, design, policy, behavior, and trauma care. The ASPA believes that a similar public health approach can succeed in saving children from death and injury from firearms. The ASPA is committed to building partnerships to accomplish this.

AB - Firearm injuries are the second most common cause of death in children who come to a trauma center, and pediatric surgeons provide crucial care for these patients. The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) is committed to comprehensive pediatric trauma readiness, including firearm injury prevention. The APSA supports a public health approach to firearm injury, and it supports availability of quality mental health services. The APSA endorses policies for universal background checks, restrictions on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, strong child access protection laws, and a minimum purchase age of 21 years. The APSA opposes efforts to keep physicians from counseling children and families about firearms. The APSA promotes research to address this problem, including increased federal research support and research into the second victim phenomenon. The ASPA supports school safety and readiness, including bleeding control training. Although it may be daunting to try to reduce firearm deaths in children, the United States has seen success in reducing motor vehicle deaths through a multidimensional approach: prevention, design, policy, behavior, and trauma care. The ASPA believes that a similar public health approach can succeed in saving children from death and injury from firearms. The ASPA is committed to building partnerships to accomplish this.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069175552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069175552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2018-3058

DO - 10.1542/peds.2018-3058

M3 - Article

C2 - 31235607

AN - SCOPUS:85069175552

VL - 144

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 1

M1 - e20183058

ER -