Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants

John Joseph Elias, J. B. Brunski

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A 3D finite element (FE) model was developed to calculate the vertical forces on dental implants supporting prosthetic bridgework. Results of PE models were compared to results of an analytical model developed by Skalak (1), and to experimental results from laboratory models of semicircular metal and acrylic bridges supported by screw-shaped titanium dental implants specially-designed to sense axial load. The dental implants in these lab models were inserted into (a) an aluminum baseplate (Ng's experiment (2) or (b) a dried human mandible (Edwards' experiment (3)) in order to vary the stiffness of the 'bone'-implant interface. FE models were constructed with beam elements for the implants and brick elements for the bridge. To simulate the effects of different stiffnesses at the bone-implant interface, some FE models used foundation elements of prescribed stiffness beneath the implant beam elements. Models were run with purely vertical forces applied at various locations along the bridge, e.g., at distal locations, midline locations and at an intermediate point. Two key results were: (a) For implants in a stiff interface, supporting either metal or acrylic bridges, the FE results were in closer agreement with experimental data than the Skalak analytical model. (b) For implants in a less stiff interface, the FE model and Skalak model predicted the implant loads accurately for the case of the metal bridge but only the FE model was accurate in the case of the acrylic bridge. For future work it will be important to obtain better data on actual interfacial stiffnesses as input data for FE models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages155-158
Number of pages4
Volume20
ISBN (Print)0791808890
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Dec 1 1991Dec 6 1991

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period12/1/9112/6/91

Fingerprint

Dental prostheses
Finite element method
Stiffness
Acrylics
Analytical models
Bone
Metals
Axial loads
Brick
Prosthetics
Titanium
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Elias, J. J., & Brunski, J. B. (1991). Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED (Vol. 20, pp. 155-158). Publ by ASME.

Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants. / Elias, John Joseph; Brunski, J. B.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 20 Publ by ASME, 1991. p. 155-158.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Elias, JJ & Brunski, JB 1991, Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants. in American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. vol. 20, Publ by ASME, pp. 155-158, Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Atlanta, GA, USA, 12/1/91.
Elias JJ, Brunski JB. Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 20. Publ by ASME. 1991. p. 155-158
Elias, John Joseph ; Brunski, J. B. / Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 20 Publ by ASME, 1991. pp. 155-158
@inproceedings{44f597e8fcda4f0aaa8193bb862f74d4,
title = "Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants",
abstract = "A 3D finite element (FE) model was developed to calculate the vertical forces on dental implants supporting prosthetic bridgework. Results of PE models were compared to results of an analytical model developed by Skalak (1), and to experimental results from laboratory models of semicircular metal and acrylic bridges supported by screw-shaped titanium dental implants specially-designed to sense axial load. The dental implants in these lab models were inserted into (a) an aluminum baseplate (Ng's experiment (2) or (b) a dried human mandible (Edwards' experiment (3)) in order to vary the stiffness of the 'bone'-implant interface. FE models were constructed with beam elements for the implants and brick elements for the bridge. To simulate the effects of different stiffnesses at the bone-implant interface, some FE models used foundation elements of prescribed stiffness beneath the implant beam elements. Models were run with purely vertical forces applied at various locations along the bridge, e.g., at distal locations, midline locations and at an intermediate point. Two key results were: (a) For implants in a stiff interface, supporting either metal or acrylic bridges, the FE results were in closer agreement with experimental data than the Skalak analytical model. (b) For implants in a less stiff interface, the FE model and Skalak model predicted the implant loads accurately for the case of the metal bridge but only the FE model was accurate in the case of the acrylic bridge. For future work it will be important to obtain better data on actual interfacial stiffnesses as input data for FE models.",
author = "Elias, {John Joseph} and Brunski, {J. B.}",
year = "1991",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0791808890",
volume = "20",
pages = "155--158",
booktitle = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED",
publisher = "Publ by ASME",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Finite element analysis of load distribution among dental implants

AU - Elias, John Joseph

AU - Brunski, J. B.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - A 3D finite element (FE) model was developed to calculate the vertical forces on dental implants supporting prosthetic bridgework. Results of PE models were compared to results of an analytical model developed by Skalak (1), and to experimental results from laboratory models of semicircular metal and acrylic bridges supported by screw-shaped titanium dental implants specially-designed to sense axial load. The dental implants in these lab models were inserted into (a) an aluminum baseplate (Ng's experiment (2) or (b) a dried human mandible (Edwards' experiment (3)) in order to vary the stiffness of the 'bone'-implant interface. FE models were constructed with beam elements for the implants and brick elements for the bridge. To simulate the effects of different stiffnesses at the bone-implant interface, some FE models used foundation elements of prescribed stiffness beneath the implant beam elements. Models were run with purely vertical forces applied at various locations along the bridge, e.g., at distal locations, midline locations and at an intermediate point. Two key results were: (a) For implants in a stiff interface, supporting either metal or acrylic bridges, the FE results were in closer agreement with experimental data than the Skalak analytical model. (b) For implants in a less stiff interface, the FE model and Skalak model predicted the implant loads accurately for the case of the metal bridge but only the FE model was accurate in the case of the acrylic bridge. For future work it will be important to obtain better data on actual interfacial stiffnesses as input data for FE models.

AB - A 3D finite element (FE) model was developed to calculate the vertical forces on dental implants supporting prosthetic bridgework. Results of PE models were compared to results of an analytical model developed by Skalak (1), and to experimental results from laboratory models of semicircular metal and acrylic bridges supported by screw-shaped titanium dental implants specially-designed to sense axial load. The dental implants in these lab models were inserted into (a) an aluminum baseplate (Ng's experiment (2) or (b) a dried human mandible (Edwards' experiment (3)) in order to vary the stiffness of the 'bone'-implant interface. FE models were constructed with beam elements for the implants and brick elements for the bridge. To simulate the effects of different stiffnesses at the bone-implant interface, some FE models used foundation elements of prescribed stiffness beneath the implant beam elements. Models were run with purely vertical forces applied at various locations along the bridge, e.g., at distal locations, midline locations and at an intermediate point. Two key results were: (a) For implants in a stiff interface, supporting either metal or acrylic bridges, the FE results were in closer agreement with experimental data than the Skalak analytical model. (b) For implants in a less stiff interface, the FE model and Skalak model predicted the implant loads accurately for the case of the metal bridge but only the FE model was accurate in the case of the acrylic bridge. For future work it will be important to obtain better data on actual interfacial stiffnesses as input data for FE models.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026270485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026270485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:0026270485

SN - 0791808890

VL - 20

SP - 155

EP - 158

BT - American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED

PB - Publ by ASME

ER -