Financial strain is associated with increased oxidative stress levels: The Women's Health and Aging Studies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Elevated oxidative stress levels may be one mechanism contributing to poor health outcomes. Financial strain and oxidative stress are each predictors of morbidity and mortality, but little research has investigated their relationship. Community-dwelling older adults (. n = 728) from the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Financial strain was ascertained as an ordinal response to: "At the end of the month, do you have more than enough money left over, just enough, or not enough?" Oxidative stress was measured using serum protein carbonyl concentrations. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship between financial strain and oxidative stress. Participants who reported high financial strain exhibited 13.4% higher protein carbonyl concentrations compared to individuals who reported low financial strain (. p = 0.002). High financial strain may be associated with increased oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress could mediate associations between financial strain and poor health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S33-S37
JournalGeriatric Nursing
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Keywords

  • Financial strain
  • Older adults
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology

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