Field trial on efficacy of supervised monthly dose of 600 mg rifampin, 400 mg ofloxacin and 100 mg minocycline for the treatment of leprosy; first results

I. Mane, J. L. Cartel, J. H. Grosset

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 1995, a field trial was implemented in Senegal in order to evaluate the efficacy of a regimen based on the monthly supervised intake of rifampin 600 mg, ofloxacin 400 mg and minocycline 100 mg to treat leprosy. During the first year of the trial, 220 patients with active leprosy (newly detected or relapsing after dapsone monotherapy) were recruited: 102 paucibacillary (PB) (60 males and 42 females) and 118 multibacillary (MB) (71 males and 47 females). All of them accepted the new treatment (none requested to be preferably put under standard WHO/MDT), no clinical sign which could be considered as a toxic effect of the drug was noted, and none of the patients refused to continue treatment because of any clinical trouble. The compliance was excellent: the 113 patients (PB and MB) detected during the first 6 months of the trial have taken six monthly doses in 6 months, as planned. The rate of clearance and the progressive decrease of cutaneous lesions was satisfactory. Although it is too soon to give comprehensive results, it should be noted that no treatment failure was observed in the 56 PB patients who have completed treatment and have been followed up for 6 months. The long-term efficacy of the new regimen is to be evaluated on the rate of relapse during the years following the cessation of treatment. If that relapse rate is acceptable (similar to that observed in patients after treatment with current standard WHO/MDT), the new regimen could be a solution to treat, for instance, patients very irregular and/or living in remote or inaccessible areas since no selection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae should be possible (a monthly dose of ofloxacin and minocycline being as effective as a dose of dapsone and clofazimine taken daily for 1 month). Nevertheless, until longer term results of this and other trials become available, there is no justification for any change in the treatment strategy, and all leprosy patients should be put under standard WHO/MDT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-229
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Leprosy
Volume65
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Minocycline
Ofloxacin
Leprosy
Rifampin
Dapsone
Therapeutics
Clofazimine
Recurrence
Mycobacterium leprae
Senegal
Withholding Treatment
Poisons
Treatment Failure
Compliance
Skin
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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Field trial on efficacy of supervised monthly dose of 600 mg rifampin, 400 mg ofloxacin and 100 mg minocycline for the treatment of leprosy; first results. / Mane, I.; Cartel, J. L.; Grosset, J. H.

In: International Journal of Leprosy, Vol. 65, No. 2, 1997, p. 224-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "In 1995, a field trial was implemented in Senegal in order to evaluate the efficacy of a regimen based on the monthly supervised intake of rifampin 600 mg, ofloxacin 400 mg and minocycline 100 mg to treat leprosy. During the first year of the trial, 220 patients with active leprosy (newly detected or relapsing after dapsone monotherapy) were recruited: 102 paucibacillary (PB) (60 males and 42 females) and 118 multibacillary (MB) (71 males and 47 females). All of them accepted the new treatment (none requested to be preferably put under standard WHO/MDT), no clinical sign which could be considered as a toxic effect of the drug was noted, and none of the patients refused to continue treatment because of any clinical trouble. The compliance was excellent: the 113 patients (PB and MB) detected during the first 6 months of the trial have taken six monthly doses in 6 months, as planned. The rate of clearance and the progressive decrease of cutaneous lesions was satisfactory. Although it is too soon to give comprehensive results, it should be noted that no treatment failure was observed in the 56 PB patients who have completed treatment and have been followed up for 6 months. The long-term efficacy of the new regimen is to be evaluated on the rate of relapse during the years following the cessation of treatment. If that relapse rate is acceptable (similar to that observed in patients after treatment with current standard WHO/MDT), the new regimen could be a solution to treat, for instance, patients very irregular and/or living in remote or inaccessible areas since no selection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae should be possible (a monthly dose of ofloxacin and minocycline being as effective as a dose of dapsone and clofazimine taken daily for 1 month). Nevertheless, until longer term results of this and other trials become available, there is no justification for any change in the treatment strategy, and all leprosy patients should be put under standard WHO/MDT.",
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