Fiber-based visible and near infrared optical coherence tomography (vnOCT) enables quantitative elastic light scattering spectroscopy in human retina

Weiye Song, Libo Zhou, Sui Zhang, Steven Ness, Manishi Desai, Ji Yi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Elastic light scattering spectroscopy (ELSS) has been proven a powerful method in measuring tissue structures with exquisite nanoscale sensitivity. However, ELSS contrast in the living human retina has been relatively underexplored, primarily due to the lack of imaging tools with a large spectral bandwidth. Here, we report a simple all fiber-based setup to implement dual-channel visible and near infrared (NIR) optical coherence tomography (vnOCT) for human retinal imaging, bridging over a 300nm spectral gap. Remarkably, the fiber components in our vnOCT system support single-mode propagation for both visible and NIR light, both of which maintain excellent interference efficiencies with fringe visibility of 97% and 90%, respectively. The longitudinal chromatic aberration from the eye is corrected by a custom-designed achromatizing lens. The elegant fiber-based design enables simultaneous imaging for both channels and allows comprehensive ELSS analysis on several important anatomical layers, including nerve fiber layer, outer segment of the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium. This vnOCT platform and method of ELSS analysis open new opportunities in understanding structure-function relationship in the human retina and in exploring new biomarkers for retinal diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number#326475
Pages (from-to)3464-3480
Number of pages17
JournalBiomedical Optics Express
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fiber-based visible and near infrared optical coherence tomography (vnOCT) enables quantitative elastic light scattering spectroscopy in human retina'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this