Femoral-based central venous oxygen saturation is not a reliable substitute for subclavian/internal jugular-based central venous oxygen saturation in patients who are critically Ill

Danielle L. Davison, Lakhmir S. Chawla, Leelie Selassie, Elizabeth M. Jones, Kayc C. McHone, Amy R. Vota, Christopher Junker, Sara Sateri, Michael G. Seneff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Central venous oxygen saturation (Scvo2) has been used as a surrogate marker for mixed venous oxygen saturation (Svo2). Femoral venous oxygen saturation (Sfvo2) is sometimes used as a substitute for Scvo2. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that these values can be used interchangeably in a population of patients who are critically ill. Methods: We conducted a survey to assess the frequency of femoral line insertion during the initial treatment of patients who are critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Patients with femoral and nonfemoral central venous catheters (CVCs) were included in this prospective study. Two sets of paired blood samples were drawn simultaneously from the femoral and nonfemoral CVCs. Blood samples were analyzed for oxygen saturation and lactate. Results: One hundred and fifty physicians responded to the survey. More than one-third of the physicians insert a femoral line at least 10% of the time during the initial treatment of patients who were critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. The mean Scvo2 and Sfvo2 were 73.1% ± 11.6% and 69.1% ± 12.9%, respectively (P = .002), with a mean bias of 4.0% ± 11.2% (95% limits of agreement: -18.4% to 26.4%). The mean serum lactate from the nonfemoral and femoral CVCs was 2.84 ± 4.0 and 2.72 ± 3.2, respectively(P = .15). Conclusions: This study revealed a significant difference between paired samples of Scvo2 and Sfvo 2. More than 50% of Scvo2 and Sfvo2 values diverged by >5%. Sfvo2 is not always a reliable substitute for Scvo2 and should not routinely be used in protocols to help guide resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-83
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Thigh
Critical Illness
Neck
Oxygen
Central Venous Catheters
Lactic Acid
Physicians
Resuscitation
Biomarkers
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics
Serum
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Femoral-based central venous oxygen saturation is not a reliable substitute for subclavian/internal jugular-based central venous oxygen saturation in patients who are critically Ill. / Davison, Danielle L.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Selassie, Leelie; Jones, Elizabeth M.; McHone, Kayc C.; Vota, Amy R.; Junker, Christopher; Sateri, Sara; Seneff, Michael G.

In: Chest, Vol. 138, No. 1, 01.07.2010, p. 76-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davison, Danielle L. ; Chawla, Lakhmir S. ; Selassie, Leelie ; Jones, Elizabeth M. ; McHone, Kayc C. ; Vota, Amy R. ; Junker, Christopher ; Sateri, Sara ; Seneff, Michael G. / Femoral-based central venous oxygen saturation is not a reliable substitute for subclavian/internal jugular-based central venous oxygen saturation in patients who are critically Ill. In: Chest. 2010 ; Vol. 138, No. 1. pp. 76-83.
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title = "Femoral-based central venous oxygen saturation is not a reliable substitute for subclavian/internal jugular-based central venous oxygen saturation in patients who are critically Ill",
abstract = "Background: Central venous oxygen saturation (Scvo2) has been used as a surrogate marker for mixed venous oxygen saturation (Svo2). Femoral venous oxygen saturation (Sfvo2) is sometimes used as a substitute for Scvo2. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that these values can be used interchangeably in a population of patients who are critically ill. Methods: We conducted a survey to assess the frequency of femoral line insertion during the initial treatment of patients who are critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Patients with femoral and nonfemoral central venous catheters (CVCs) were included in this prospective study. Two sets of paired blood samples were drawn simultaneously from the femoral and nonfemoral CVCs. Blood samples were analyzed for oxygen saturation and lactate. Results: One hundred and fifty physicians responded to the survey. More than one-third of the physicians insert a femoral line at least 10{\%} of the time during the initial treatment of patients who were critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. The mean Scvo2 and Sfvo2 were 73.1{\%} ± 11.6{\%} and 69.1{\%} ± 12.9{\%}, respectively (P = .002), with a mean bias of 4.0{\%} ± 11.2{\%} (95{\%} limits of agreement: -18.4{\%} to 26.4{\%}). The mean serum lactate from the nonfemoral and femoral CVCs was 2.84 ± 4.0 and 2.72 ± 3.2, respectively(P = .15). Conclusions: This study revealed a significant difference between paired samples of Scvo2 and Sfvo 2. More than 50{\%} of Scvo2 and Sfvo2 values diverged by >5{\%}. Sfvo2 is not always a reliable substitute for Scvo2 and should not routinely be used in protocols to help guide resuscitation.",
author = "Davison, {Danielle L.} and Chawla, {Lakhmir S.} and Leelie Selassie and Jones, {Elizabeth M.} and McHone, {Kayc C.} and Vota, {Amy R.} and Christopher Junker and Sara Sateri and Seneff, {Michael G.}",
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T1 - Femoral-based central venous oxygen saturation is not a reliable substitute for subclavian/internal jugular-based central venous oxygen saturation in patients who are critically Ill

AU - Davison, Danielle L.

AU - Chawla, Lakhmir S.

AU - Selassie, Leelie

AU - Jones, Elizabeth M.

AU - McHone, Kayc C.

AU - Vota, Amy R.

AU - Junker, Christopher

AU - Sateri, Sara

AU - Seneff, Michael G.

PY - 2010/7/1

Y1 - 2010/7/1

N2 - Background: Central venous oxygen saturation (Scvo2) has been used as a surrogate marker for mixed venous oxygen saturation (Svo2). Femoral venous oxygen saturation (Sfvo2) is sometimes used as a substitute for Scvo2. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that these values can be used interchangeably in a population of patients who are critically ill. Methods: We conducted a survey to assess the frequency of femoral line insertion during the initial treatment of patients who are critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Patients with femoral and nonfemoral central venous catheters (CVCs) were included in this prospective study. Two sets of paired blood samples were drawn simultaneously from the femoral and nonfemoral CVCs. Blood samples were analyzed for oxygen saturation and lactate. Results: One hundred and fifty physicians responded to the survey. More than one-third of the physicians insert a femoral line at least 10% of the time during the initial treatment of patients who were critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. The mean Scvo2 and Sfvo2 were 73.1% ± 11.6% and 69.1% ± 12.9%, respectively (P = .002), with a mean bias of 4.0% ± 11.2% (95% limits of agreement: -18.4% to 26.4%). The mean serum lactate from the nonfemoral and femoral CVCs was 2.84 ± 4.0 and 2.72 ± 3.2, respectively(P = .15). Conclusions: This study revealed a significant difference between paired samples of Scvo2 and Sfvo 2. More than 50% of Scvo2 and Sfvo2 values diverged by >5%. Sfvo2 is not always a reliable substitute for Scvo2 and should not routinely be used in protocols to help guide resuscitation.

AB - Background: Central venous oxygen saturation (Scvo2) has been used as a surrogate marker for mixed venous oxygen saturation (Svo2). Femoral venous oxygen saturation (Sfvo2) is sometimes used as a substitute for Scvo2. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that these values can be used interchangeably in a population of patients who are critically ill. Methods: We conducted a survey to assess the frequency of femoral line insertion during the initial treatment of patients who are critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Patients with femoral and nonfemoral central venous catheters (CVCs) were included in this prospective study. Two sets of paired blood samples were drawn simultaneously from the femoral and nonfemoral CVCs. Blood samples were analyzed for oxygen saturation and lactate. Results: One hundred and fifty physicians responded to the survey. More than one-third of the physicians insert a femoral line at least 10% of the time during the initial treatment of patients who were critically ill. Scvo2 vs Sfvo2 Study: Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. The mean Scvo2 and Sfvo2 were 73.1% ± 11.6% and 69.1% ± 12.9%, respectively (P = .002), with a mean bias of 4.0% ± 11.2% (95% limits of agreement: -18.4% to 26.4%). The mean serum lactate from the nonfemoral and femoral CVCs was 2.84 ± 4.0 and 2.72 ± 3.2, respectively(P = .15). Conclusions: This study revealed a significant difference between paired samples of Scvo2 and Sfvo 2. More than 50% of Scvo2 and Sfvo2 values diverged by >5%. Sfvo2 is not always a reliable substitute for Scvo2 and should not routinely be used in protocols to help guide resuscitation.

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