Female hip fracture patients had poorer performance-based functioning than community-dwelling peers over 2-year follow-up period

Lisa Fredman, Jay Magaziner, William Hawkes, J. Richard Hebel, Linda P Fried, Judith D. Kasper, Jack Guralnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Compare performance-based functioning over 2 years among elderly women hip fracture patients vs. community-dwelling older women. Methods and Setting: 268 hip fracture patients from eight hospitals in Baltimore, MD, in 1990-1991, and 486 respondents from the Women's Health and Aging Study I (WHAS I) were assessed prospectively at 6-month intervals for 2 years. Usual and rapid walking speeds, and chair rise time, were calculated and standardized to the baseline distribution of the WHAS subsample. Results: At baseline, all respondents were aged 65+ years, White, cognitively intact, and could walk across a room independently. Hip fracture patients had significantly poorer functioning than WHAS respondents at each follow-up interview through 24 months postfracture. The difference was greatest at 6 months: mean walking speed for hip fracture patients was approximately one standard deviation lower than for WHAS respondents for usual pace (adjusted difference = -1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -1.22, -0.89) and rapid pace (adjusted difference = -0.95, 95% CI = -1.13, -0.79). These differences were most pronounced among respondents who were aged 80+ years or had comorbid conditions. Conclusion: Elderly women had poorer performance-based functioning over 2 years following hip fracture than would be expected by normal aging in same-aged women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1289-1298
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume58
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

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Independent Living
Hip Fractures
Confidence Intervals
Baltimore
Women's Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Interviews

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Aging
  • Disability assessment
  • Hip fractures
  • Performance-based measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Female hip fracture patients had poorer performance-based functioning than community-dwelling peers over 2-year follow-up period. / Fredman, Lisa; Magaziner, Jay; Hawkes, William; Hebel, J. Richard; Fried, Linda P; Kasper, Judith D.; Guralnik, Jack.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 58, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 1289-1298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fredman, Lisa ; Magaziner, Jay ; Hawkes, William ; Hebel, J. Richard ; Fried, Linda P ; Kasper, Judith D. ; Guralnik, Jack. / Female hip fracture patients had poorer performance-based functioning than community-dwelling peers over 2-year follow-up period. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2005 ; Vol. 58, No. 12. pp. 1289-1298.
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