Feeding green vegetables to the young children in rural Bangladesh: an analysis of intake following education to the caregivers.

M. Yunus, K. M. Aziz, A. I. Chowdhury, R. B. Sack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study was undertaken to increase the intake of vegetables rich in beta-carotene by young children through nutrition education of their caregivers. 156 children aged 6-59 months were selected from households of very poor socioeconomic status in the comparison area of Matlab MCH-FP Project. Nutrition education intervention was provided to the caregivers of these children on the importance of feeding vegetables rich in beta-carotene. This education included verbal communication and cooking demonstrations. It was provided by trained female community health workers once every 2 months over a period of 12 months from April 1994 to March 1995. Information on the consumption of green leafy vegetables by the children for the preceding 3 days was collected at baseline and after the 12-month intervention by interviewing the caregivers. The green leafy vegetables were categorized into high, medium, and low contents of beta-carotene. The proportion of children who consumed vegetables with high content of beta-carotene increased from 28% at the baseline to 96% after the intervention, showing a highly significant increase (p .000). The mean frequency of intake of vegetables rose from 0.65 per 3 days at baseline to 4.33 after the intervention. This increase in intake was also highly significant (p .000). The significant increase in the consumption of vegetables was achieved within a period of one year from the intervention. This shows that changes in the feeding practices of young children were feasible through education and motivation, which can develop confidence among the caregivers regarding the beneficial outcome of the recommended foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-6
Number of pages2
JournalGlimpse (Dhaka, Bangladesh)
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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