Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation and permeability associated with the subsequent acquisition of linear growth deficits in infants

Margaret Kosek, Rashidul Haque, Aldo Lima, Sudhir Babji, Sanjaya Shrestha, Shahida Qureshi, Samie Amidou, Estomih Mduma, Gwenyth Lee, Pablo Peñataro Yori, Richard L. Guerrant, Zulfiqar Bhutta, Carl Mason, Gagandeep Kang, Mamun Kabir, Caroline Amour, Pascal Bessong, Ali Turab, Jessica Seidman, Maribel Paredes OlorteguiJosiane Quetz, Dennis Lang, Jean Gratz, Mark Miller, Michael Gottlieb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Enteric infections are associated with linear growth failure in children. To quantify the association between intestinal inflammation and linear growth failure three commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (neopterin [NEO], alpha-anti-trypsin [AAT], and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were performed in a structured sampling of asymptomatic stool from children under longitudinal surveillance for diarrheal illness in eight countries. Samples from 537 children contributed 1,169 AAT, 916 MPO, and 954 NEO test results that were significantly associated with linear growth. When combined to form a disease activity score, children with the highest score grew 1.08 cm less than children with the lowest score over the 6-month period following the tests after controlling for the incidence of diarrheal disease. This set of affordable non-invasive tests delineates those at risk of linear growth failure and may be used for the improved assessments of interventions to optimize growth during a critical period of early childhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-396
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation and permeability associated with the subsequent acquisition of linear growth deficits in infants'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this