Fecal incontinence: Office-based management

Tisha Lunsford, Jonathan Efron

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The key to successful office-based management of fecal incontinence is appropriate characterization of the incontinence and a subsequent tiered approach to treatment. If possible, it is imperative to classify the underlying pathophysiology of the patient’s fecal incontinence as this will direct treatment strategies and may predict outcomes. The differential diagnosis of fecal incontinence is vast (Table 1) (1-3). Moreover, as the development of fecal incontinence is multifactorial, it is important that the clinician carefully extract and isolate which pathophysiologic factors are responsible for the incontinence. Improvement in any single factor may provide significant clinical improvements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmbulatory Colorectal Surgery
PublisherCRC Press
Pages121-133
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781420016192
ISBN (Print)0824727924, 9780824727925
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Office Management
Fecal Incontinence
Differential Diagnosis
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lunsford, T., & Efron, J. (2008). Fecal incontinence: Office-based management. In Ambulatory Colorectal Surgery (pp. 121-133). CRC Press.

Fecal incontinence : Office-based management. / Lunsford, Tisha; Efron, Jonathan.

Ambulatory Colorectal Surgery. CRC Press, 2008. p. 121-133.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Lunsford, T & Efron, J 2008, Fecal incontinence: Office-based management. in Ambulatory Colorectal Surgery. CRC Press, pp. 121-133.
Lunsford T, Efron J. Fecal incontinence: Office-based management. In Ambulatory Colorectal Surgery. CRC Press. 2008. p. 121-133
Lunsford, Tisha ; Efron, Jonathan. / Fecal incontinence : Office-based management. Ambulatory Colorectal Surgery. CRC Press, 2008. pp. 121-133
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