Feasibility of using recipients of health promotional newsletters for post-marketing surveillance

Lucy A. Mead, Daniel E Ford, Lewis H. Roht, C. L. Beach, Michael John Klag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Achieving an adequate sample size is one of the major difficulties in performing post-marketing observational studies of health outcomes in persons taking specific drug preparations. We assessed the feasibility of recruiting participants for such a study of Cardizem(®) CD from approximately 400,000 U.S. recipients of a health promotion newsletter. A three-page questionnaire was sent to a 2.5% random sample (n = 10,000) of recipients, stratified by geographic region. After two mailings, 2779 (28%) returned the questionnaire. Of the 2779 respondents, 2132 (77%) reported having high blood pressure. Eighty-seven percent indicated a willingness to participate in a long-term prospective study. In a multivariate model, calcium channel blocker (CCB) use was associated with a history of coronary heart disease, duration of hypertension medication use greater than 1 year, a rating of good or excellent hypertension care, higher systolic blood pressure, higher education level, family history of cardiovascular disease, and history of smoking. These results indicate that self-reported CCB users may be at greater risk of cardiovascular heart disease and that it is feasible to use health promotion newsletters as a source of participants in prospective studies of cardiovascular disease. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-660
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000

Fingerprint

Marketing
Hypertension
Cardiovascular Diseases
Health
Calcium Channel Blockers
Health Promotion
Prospective Studies
Drug Compounding
Diltiazem
Sample Size
Observational Studies
Coronary Disease
Heart Diseases
Smoking
Blood Pressure
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Calcium channel blockers
  • Health promotional newsletters
  • Post-marketing surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Feasibility of using recipients of health promotional newsletters for post-marketing surveillance. / Mead, Lucy A.; Ford, Daniel E; Roht, Lewis H.; Beach, C. L.; Klag, Michael John.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 53, No. 6, 06.2000, p. 653-660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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