Feasibility of keying data from screen-displayed facsimile images in an ongoing trial: The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study

Marie Diener-West, Paul B. Connor, M. Marvin Newhouse, Barbara S. Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As part of an ongoing clinical trial, we conducted an experiment to assess the feasibility and to determine the reliability of data entry from a computer screen display of images of data collection forms transmitted by facsimile (fax) machines directly into a computer for payer forms designed without consideration of fax or image display requirements. Feasibility was assessed on the basis of accuracy and reliability of data entry and on operator satisfaction. During a 2-week period, half of the forms received at the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) coordinating center were key-entered twice, using the payer forms as the source (paper source entry). The remaining forms were entered once using paper source and were later reentered using the screen display of images of the fared forms as the source (image source entry). The latter group of forms, or 50% of all forms received, were entered a third time, using the image source entry. Two data entry operators participated in the experiment. Discrepancy rates between and within data entry operators were calculated for both modes of entry. A total of 50,861 keystrokes (28,095 items) across 1122 records were checked for consistency. The overall discrepancy rate associated with double paper source entry was approximately 21 per 10,000 keystrokes (20 per 10,000 items). Discrepancy rates associated with paper source versus image source entry (53 per 10,000 keystrokes [57 per 10,000 items]) and double image source entry (57 per 10,000 keystrokes [47 per 10,000 items]) were similar in magnitude. Image source entry of forms received by facsimile may provide an acceptable alternative to paper entry in ongoing multicenter clinical trials where the costs of converting existing forms and systems to automated data capture may be unacceptable. This experiment confirmed the feasibility of such an alternative and suggested that improved screen displays and changes in equipment to facilitate entry of data from the screen display may enhance accuracy of entries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-49
Number of pages11
JournalControlled clinical trials
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1998

Keywords

  • Discrepancy rates
  • Double data entry
  • Image source
  • Image-based entry
  • Key data entry
  • Paper source

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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