Feasibility of interactive biking exercise system for telemanagement in elderly

Joseph Finkelstein, In Cheol Jeong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Inexpensive cycling equipment is widely available for home exercise however its use is hampered by lack of tools supporting real-time monitoring of cycling exercise in elderly and coordination with a clinical care team. To address these barriers, we developed a low-cost mobile system aimed at facilitating safe and effective home-based cycling exercise. The system used a miniature wireless 3-axis accelerometer that transmitted the cycling acceleration data to a tablet PC that was integrated with a multi-component disease management system. An exercise dashboard was presented to a patient allowing real-time graphical visualization of exercise progress. The system was programmed to alert patients when exercise intensity exceeded the levels recommended by the patient care providers and to exchange information with a central server. The feasibility of the system was assessed by testing the accuracy of cycling speed monitoring and reliability of alerts generated by the system. Our results demonstrated high validity of the system both for upper and lower extremity exercise monitoring as well as reliable data transmission between home unit and central server.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages642-646
Number of pages5
Volume192
Edition1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event14th World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics, MEDINFO 2013 - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: Aug 20 2013Aug 23 2013

Other

Other14th World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics, MEDINFO 2013
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period8/20/138/23/13

Fingerprint

Exercise
Monitoring
Servers
Accelerometers
Data communication systems
Visualization
Testing
Disease Management
Costs
Tablets
Lower Extremity
Patient Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • exercise
  • personal health systems
  • Physiological signal processing
  • self-management
  • telerehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Finkelstein, J., & Jeong, I. C. (2013). Feasibility of interactive biking exercise system for telemanagement in elderly. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (1-2 ed., Vol. 192, pp. 642-646) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-289-9-642

Feasibility of interactive biking exercise system for telemanagement in elderly. / Finkelstein, Joseph; Jeong, In Cheol.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 192 1-2. ed. 2013. p. 642-646.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Finkelstein, J & Jeong, IC 2013, Feasibility of interactive biking exercise system for telemanagement in elderly. in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. 1-2 edn, vol. 192, pp. 642-646, 14th World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics, MEDINFO 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark, 8/20/13. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-289-9-642
Finkelstein J, Jeong IC. Feasibility of interactive biking exercise system for telemanagement in elderly. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. 1-2 ed. Vol. 192. 2013. p. 642-646 https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-289-9-642
Finkelstein, Joseph ; Jeong, In Cheol. / Feasibility of interactive biking exercise system for telemanagement in elderly. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 192 1-2. ed. 2013. pp. 642-646
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