Feasibility and acceptability of a bar-based sexual risk reduction intervention for bar patrons in Tshwane, South Africa

Neo K. Morojele, Naledi Kitleli, Kgalabi Ngako, Connie T. Kekwaletswe, Sebenzile Nkosi, Katherine Fritz, Charles D H Parry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Alcohol consumption is a recognised risk factor for HIV infection. Alcohol serving establishments have been identified as appropriate venues in which to deliver HIV prevention interventions. This paper describes experiences and lessons learnt from implementing a combined HIV prevention intervention in bar settings in one city- and one township-based bar in Tshwane, South Africa. The intervention consisted of peer-led and brief intervention counselling sub-components. Thirty-nine bar patrons were recruited and trained, and delivered HIV and alcohol risk reduction activities to their peers as peer interventionists. At the same time, nine counsellors received training and visited the bars weekly to provide brief motivational interviewing counselling, advice, and referrals to the patrons of the bars. A responsible server sub-component that had also been planned was not delivered as it was not feasible to train the staff in the two participating bars. Over the eight-month period the counsellors were approached by and provided advice and counselling for alcohol and sexual risk-related problems to 111 bar patrons. The peer interventionists reported 1323 risk reduction interactions with their fellow bar patrons during the same period. The intervention was overall well received and suggests that bar patrons and servers can accept a myriad of intervention activities to reduce sexual risk behaviour within their drinking settings. However, HIV- and AIDS-related stigma hindered participation in certain intervention activities in some instances. The buy-in that we received from the relevant stakeholders (i.e. bar owners/managers and patrons, and the community at large) was an important contributor to the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalSahara J
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Risk Reduction Behavior
South Africa
HIV
Counseling
Alcohols
Motivational Interviewing
counseling
alcohol
Risk-Taking
counselor
Sexual Behavior
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
HIV Infections
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Referral and Consultation
alcohol consumption
risk behavior
AIDS
stakeholder

Keywords

  • bar-based intervention
  • brief intervention
  • HIV prevention
  • motivational interviewing
  • peer intervention
  • server intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Morojele, N. K., Kitleli, N., Ngako, K., Kekwaletswe, C. T., Nkosi, S., Fritz, K., & Parry, C. D. H. (2014). Feasibility and acceptability of a bar-based sexual risk reduction intervention for bar patrons in Tshwane, South Africa. Sahara J, 11(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/17290376.2014.890123

Feasibility and acceptability of a bar-based sexual risk reduction intervention for bar patrons in Tshwane, South Africa. / Morojele, Neo K.; Kitleli, Naledi; Ngako, Kgalabi; Kekwaletswe, Connie T.; Nkosi, Sebenzile; Fritz, Katherine; Parry, Charles D H.

In: Sahara J, Vol. 11, No. 1, 02.01.2014, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morojele, NK, Kitleli, N, Ngako, K, Kekwaletswe, CT, Nkosi, S, Fritz, K & Parry, CDH 2014, 'Feasibility and acceptability of a bar-based sexual risk reduction intervention for bar patrons in Tshwane, South Africa', Sahara J, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/17290376.2014.890123
Morojele, Neo K. ; Kitleli, Naledi ; Ngako, Kgalabi ; Kekwaletswe, Connie T. ; Nkosi, Sebenzile ; Fritz, Katherine ; Parry, Charles D H. / Feasibility and acceptability of a bar-based sexual risk reduction intervention for bar patrons in Tshwane, South Africa. In: Sahara J. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 1-9.
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