Favorable socioeconomic status and recreational polydrug use are linked with sexual hepatitis C virus transmission among human immunodeficiency virus-infected men who have sex with men

Yun Chi Chen, Kjell J. Wiberg, Yu Hsiang Hsieh, Arun Bansal, Philipe Bolzan, Janelle A. Guy, Erastus N. Maina, Andrea L. Cox, Chloe L. Thio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) is an emerging issue. Studies addressing the temporal trends and risk factors associated with incident HCV in HIV-infected MSM in the community-based primary care settings in the United States are scarce. Methods. Using a retrospective cohort study design, HCV incidence, defined as HCV antibody seroconversion, was determined in 1147 HIV-infected men receiving care at Chase Brexton Health Care clinics in Baltimore, Maryland between 2004 and 2014. Multivariate regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with incident HCV. Results. There were 42 incident HCV infections during 5242 person-years (PY) of follow up (incidence rate [IR], 8.01/1000 PY). Thirty-seven (88%) of the incident infections were in MSM, of whom 31 (84%) reported no injection-drug use (IDU). The annual IRs for MSM were 13.1-15.8/1000 PY between 2004 and 2007, decreased to 2.7-6.2/1000 PY between 2008 and 2011, and increased to 10.4/1000 PY and 13.3/1000 PY in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Injection-drug use was strongly associated with incident HCV among all MSM (IR ratio [IRR], 14.15; P =.003); however, among MSM without IDU, entering care between 2010 and 2013 (IRR, 3.32; P =.01), being employed (IRR, 3.14; P =.03), and having a history of ulcerative sexually transmitted infections (IRR, 3.70; P =.009) or of polydrug use (IRR, 5.54; P =.01) independently predicted incident HCV. Conclusions. In this cohort of HIV-infected men, a re-emerging HCV epidemic was observed from 2011 to 2014 among MSM. In addition to IDU, high-risk sexual behaviors, favorable socioeconomic status, and polydrug use fueled this increase in HCV infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberofw137
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • HIV
  • MSM
  • Polydrug use
  • Sexual HCV transmission
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Neurology

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