Fatalities in the Peace Corps: A Retrospective Study: 1962 Through 1983

Stephen W. Hargarten, Susan P. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Fatalities among Peace Corps volunteers were analyzed for 1962 through 1983, with individual case histories reviewed for all deaths from 1977 through 1983. Unintentional injuries accounted for 70% of the 185 deaths of Peace Corps volunteers, with motor vehicle crashes the number 1 cause of death. The death rate from unintentional injuries for women was significantly higher than the comparable US rate. Motorcycles caused 12% of all Peace Corps deaths and 33% of all motor vehicle deaths. Suicide has emerged as a leading cause of death among volunteers, accounting for 13% of all deaths from 1981 through 1983. Greater emphasis on injury control measures is needed to reduce this toll.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1326-1329
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume254
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 1985

Fingerprint

Peace Corps
Retrospective Studies
Volunteers
Motor Vehicles
Cause of Death
Wounds and Injuries
Motorcycles
Suicide
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fatalities in the Peace Corps : A Retrospective Study: 1962 Through 1983. / Hargarten, Stephen W.; Baker, Susan P.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 254, No. 10, 13.09.1985, p. 1326-1329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hargarten, Stephen W. ; Baker, Susan P. / Fatalities in the Peace Corps : A Retrospective Study: 1962 Through 1983. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1985 ; Vol. 254, No. 10. pp. 1326-1329.
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