Fast and slow skeletal troponin I in serum from patients with various skeletal muscle disorders: A pilot study

Jeremy A. Simpson, Ralf Labugger, Christine Collier, Robert J. Brison, Steve Iscoe, Jennifer E. Van Eyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Detection of skeletal muscle injury is hampered by a lack of commercially available assays for serum markers specific for skeletal muscle; serum concentrations of skeletal troponin I (sTnI) could meet this need. Moreover, because sTnI exists in 2 isoforms, slow (ssTnI) and fast (fsTnI), corresponding to slow- and fast-twitch muscles, respectively, it could provide insight into differential injury/recovery of specific fiber types. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the 2 isoforms of sTnI and their modified forms are present in the blood of patients with various skeletal muscle disorders. Methods: Serial serum samples were obtained from 25 patients with various skeletal muscle injuries. Serum proteins were separated by a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protocol followed by Western blotting for sTnI with monoclonal antibodies specific to ssTnI and fsTnI. Results: We observed (a) intact and, in some cases, degraded sTnI products; (b) evidence of posttranslational modifications in addition to proteolysis; and (c) differential detectability of both skeletal isoforms in the same patient. Conclusions: It is possible to monitor both sTnI isoforms; this could lead to the development of new diagnostic assays for skeletal muscle damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)966-972
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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Troponin I
Muscular Diseases
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Protein Isoforms
Serum
Assays
Wounds and Injuries
Proteolysis
Post Translational Protein Processing
Electrophoresis
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Blood Proteins
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Blood
Biomarkers
Western Blotting
Monoclonal Antibodies
Recovery
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Fast and slow skeletal troponin I in serum from patients with various skeletal muscle disorders : A pilot study. / Simpson, Jeremy A.; Labugger, Ralf; Collier, Christine; Brison, Robert J.; Iscoe, Steve; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 51, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 966-972.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simpson, Jeremy A. ; Labugger, Ralf ; Collier, Christine ; Brison, Robert J. ; Iscoe, Steve ; Van Eyk, Jennifer E. / Fast and slow skeletal troponin I in serum from patients with various skeletal muscle disorders : A pilot study. In: Clinical Chemistry. 2005 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 966-972.
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