Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement

Steven F. Solga, Matthew L. Mudalel, Lisa A. Spacek, Terence H. Risby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere51658
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 11 2014

Keywords

  • Ammonia
  • Breath
  • Breath analysis
  • Breath measurement
  • Issue 88
  • Medicine
  • QEPAS
  • Volatile organic compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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