Family presence and participation during medical visits of heart failure patients: An analysis of survey and audiotaped communication data

Crystal W. Cené, Beth Haymore, Jeffrey P. Laux, Feng Chang Lin, Dana Carthron, Debra Roter, Lisa A Cooper, Patricia P. Chang, Brian C. Jensen, Paula F. Miller, Giselle Corbie-Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To describe the frequency, roles, and utility of family companion involvement in the care of patients with Heart Failure (HF) care and to examine the association between audiotaped patient, companion, and provider communication behaviors. Methods We collected survey data and audiotaped a single medical visit for 93 HF patients (36 brought a companion into the examination room) and their cardiology provider. Communication data was analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Results There were 32% more positive rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) and almost three times as many social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) from patients and companions in accompanied visits versus unaccompanied patient visits. There were less psychosocial information giving statements in accompanied visits compared to unaccompanied patient visits (p < 0.01.) Providers made 25% more biomedical information giving statements (p = 0.04) and almost three times more social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) in accompanied visits. Providers asked fewer biomedical and psychosocial questions in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits. Providers made 16% fewer partnership-building statements in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits (p = 0.01). Conclusions Our findings are mixed regarding the benefits of accompaniment for facilitating patient-provider communication based on survey and audiotaped data. Practice implications Strategies to enhance engagement during visits, such as pre-visit question prompt lists, may be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-258
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Heart Failure
Communication
Cardiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Patient Care

Keywords

  • Family
  • Heart failure
  • Patient-provider communication
  • Social support
  • Visit companions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Family presence and participation during medical visits of heart failure patients : An analysis of survey and audiotaped communication data. / Cené, Crystal W.; Haymore, Beth; Laux, Jeffrey P.; Lin, Feng Chang; Carthron, Dana; Roter, Debra; Cooper, Lisa A; Chang, Patricia P.; Jensen, Brian C.; Miller, Paula F.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 100, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 250-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cené, Crystal W. ; Haymore, Beth ; Laux, Jeffrey P. ; Lin, Feng Chang ; Carthron, Dana ; Roter, Debra ; Cooper, Lisa A ; Chang, Patricia P. ; Jensen, Brian C. ; Miller, Paula F. ; Corbie-Smith, Giselle. / Family presence and participation during medical visits of heart failure patients : An analysis of survey and audiotaped communication data. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2017 ; Vol. 100, No. 2. pp. 250-258.
@article{97c8c141111744c6955fcf32414b7ef6,
title = "Family presence and participation during medical visits of heart failure patients: An analysis of survey and audiotaped communication data",
abstract = "Objective To describe the frequency, roles, and utility of family companion involvement in the care of patients with Heart Failure (HF) care and to examine the association between audiotaped patient, companion, and provider communication behaviors. Methods We collected survey data and audiotaped a single medical visit for 93 HF patients (36 brought a companion into the examination room) and their cardiology provider. Communication data was analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Results There were 32{\%} more positive rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) and almost three times as many social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) from patients and companions in accompanied visits versus unaccompanied patient visits. There were less psychosocial information giving statements in accompanied visits compared to unaccompanied patient visits (p < 0.01.) Providers made 25{\%} more biomedical information giving statements (p = 0.04) and almost three times more social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) in accompanied visits. Providers asked fewer biomedical and psychosocial questions in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits. Providers made 16{\%} fewer partnership-building statements in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits (p = 0.01). Conclusions Our findings are mixed regarding the benefits of accompaniment for facilitating patient-provider communication based on survey and audiotaped data. Practice implications Strategies to enhance engagement during visits, such as pre-visit question prompt lists, may be beneficial.",
keywords = "Family, Heart failure, Patient-provider communication, Social support, Visit companions",
author = "Cen{\'e}, {Crystal W.} and Beth Haymore and Laux, {Jeffrey P.} and Lin, {Feng Chang} and Dana Carthron and Debra Roter and Cooper, {Lisa A} and Chang, {Patricia P.} and Jensen, {Brian C.} and Miller, {Paula F.} and Giselle Corbie-Smith",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "250--258",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family presence and participation during medical visits of heart failure patients

T2 - An analysis of survey and audiotaped communication data

AU - Cené, Crystal W.

AU - Haymore, Beth

AU - Laux, Jeffrey P.

AU - Lin, Feng Chang

AU - Carthron, Dana

AU - Roter, Debra

AU - Cooper, Lisa A

AU - Chang, Patricia P.

AU - Jensen, Brian C.

AU - Miller, Paula F.

AU - Corbie-Smith, Giselle

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Objective To describe the frequency, roles, and utility of family companion involvement in the care of patients with Heart Failure (HF) care and to examine the association between audiotaped patient, companion, and provider communication behaviors. Methods We collected survey data and audiotaped a single medical visit for 93 HF patients (36 brought a companion into the examination room) and their cardiology provider. Communication data was analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Results There were 32% more positive rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) and almost three times as many social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) from patients and companions in accompanied visits versus unaccompanied patient visits. There were less psychosocial information giving statements in accompanied visits compared to unaccompanied patient visits (p < 0.01.) Providers made 25% more biomedical information giving statements (p = 0.04) and almost three times more social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) in accompanied visits. Providers asked fewer biomedical and psychosocial questions in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits. Providers made 16% fewer partnership-building statements in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits (p = 0.01). Conclusions Our findings are mixed regarding the benefits of accompaniment for facilitating patient-provider communication based on survey and audiotaped data. Practice implications Strategies to enhance engagement during visits, such as pre-visit question prompt lists, may be beneficial.

AB - Objective To describe the frequency, roles, and utility of family companion involvement in the care of patients with Heart Failure (HF) care and to examine the association between audiotaped patient, companion, and provider communication behaviors. Methods We collected survey data and audiotaped a single medical visit for 93 HF patients (36 brought a companion into the examination room) and their cardiology provider. Communication data was analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Results There were 32% more positive rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) and almost three times as many social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) from patients and companions in accompanied visits versus unaccompanied patient visits. There were less psychosocial information giving statements in accompanied visits compared to unaccompanied patient visits (p < 0.01.) Providers made 25% more biomedical information giving statements (p = 0.04) and almost three times more social rapport-building statements (p < 0.01) in accompanied visits. Providers asked fewer biomedical and psychosocial questions in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits. Providers made 16% fewer partnership-building statements in accompanied versus unaccompanied visits (p = 0.01). Conclusions Our findings are mixed regarding the benefits of accompaniment for facilitating patient-provider communication based on survey and audiotaped data. Practice implications Strategies to enhance engagement during visits, such as pre-visit question prompt lists, may be beneficial.

KW - Family

KW - Heart failure

KW - Patient-provider communication

KW - Social support

KW - Visit companions

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85004125697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85004125697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.001

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.09.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 27609321

AN - SCOPUS:85004125697

VL - 100

SP - 250

EP - 258

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 2

ER -