Family companions' involvement during pre-surgical consent visits for major cancer surgery and its relationship to visit communication and satisfaction

Sarina R. Isenberg, Rebecca A. Aslakson, James N. Dionne-Odom, Katherine Smith, Sarabdeep Singh, Susan M Larson, John F.P. Bridges, Thomas J Smith, Jennifer Wolff, Debra Roter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between family companion presence during pre-surgical visits to discuss major cancer surgery and patient-provider communication and satisfaction. Methods: Secondary analysis of 61 pre-surgical visit recordings with eight surgical oncologists at an academic tertiary care hospital using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Surgeons, patients, and companions completed post-visit satisfaction questionnaires. Poisson and logistic regression models assessed differences in communication and satisfaction when companions were present vs. absent. Results: There were 46 visits (75%) in which companions were present, and 15 (25%) in which companions were absent. Companion communication was largely emotional and facilitative, as measured by RIAS. Companion presence was associated with more surgeon talk (IRR 1.29, p = 0.006), and medical information-giving (IRR 1.41, p = 0.001). Companion presence was associated with less disclosure of lifestyle/psychosocial topics by patients (IRR 0.55, p = 0.037). In adjusted analyses, companions' presence was associated with lower levels of patient-centeredness (IRR 0.77, p 0.004). There were no differences in patient or surgeon satisfaction based on companion presence. Conclusion: Companions' presence during pre-surgical visits was associated with patient-surgeon communication but was not associated with patient or surgeon satisfaction. Practice implications: Future work is needed to develop interventions to enhance patient-companion-provider interactions in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Communication
Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Disclosure
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers
Life Style
Surgeons
insulin receptor-related receptor

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Companion
  • Family caregiver
  • Patient-provider communication
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Family companions' involvement during pre-surgical consent visits for major cancer surgery and its relationship to visit communication and satisfaction",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the association between family companion presence during pre-surgical visits to discuss major cancer surgery and patient-provider communication and satisfaction. Methods: Secondary analysis of 61 pre-surgical visit recordings with eight surgical oncologists at an academic tertiary care hospital using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Surgeons, patients, and companions completed post-visit satisfaction questionnaires. Poisson and logistic regression models assessed differences in communication and satisfaction when companions were present vs. absent. Results: There were 46 visits (75{\%}) in which companions were present, and 15 (25{\%}) in which companions were absent. Companion communication was largely emotional and facilitative, as measured by RIAS. Companion presence was associated with more surgeon talk (IRR 1.29, p = 0.006), and medical information-giving (IRR 1.41, p = 0.001). Companion presence was associated with less disclosure of lifestyle/psychosocial topics by patients (IRR 0.55, p = 0.037). In adjusted analyses, companions' presence was associated with lower levels of patient-centeredness (IRR 0.77, p 0.004). There were no differences in patient or surgeon satisfaction based on companion presence. Conclusion: Companions' presence during pre-surgical visits was associated with patient-surgeon communication but was not associated with patient or surgeon satisfaction. Practice implications: Future work is needed to develop interventions to enhance patient-companion-provider interactions in this setting.",
keywords = "Cancer, Companion, Family caregiver, Patient-provider communication, Surgery",
author = "Isenberg, {Sarina R.} and Aslakson, {Rebecca A.} and Dionne-Odom, {James N.} and Katherine Smith and Sarabdeep Singh and Larson, {Susan M} and Bridges, {John F.P.} and Smith, {Thomas J} and Jennifer Wolff and Debra Roter",
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T1 - Family companions' involvement during pre-surgical consent visits for major cancer surgery and its relationship to visit communication and satisfaction

AU - Isenberg, Sarina R.

AU - Aslakson, Rebecca A.

AU - Dionne-Odom, James N.

AU - Smith, Katherine

AU - Singh, Sarabdeep

AU - Larson, Susan M

AU - Bridges, John F.P.

AU - Smith, Thomas J

AU - Wolff, Jennifer

AU - Roter, Debra

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the association between family companion presence during pre-surgical visits to discuss major cancer surgery and patient-provider communication and satisfaction. Methods: Secondary analysis of 61 pre-surgical visit recordings with eight surgical oncologists at an academic tertiary care hospital using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Surgeons, patients, and companions completed post-visit satisfaction questionnaires. Poisson and logistic regression models assessed differences in communication and satisfaction when companions were present vs. absent. Results: There were 46 visits (75%) in which companions were present, and 15 (25%) in which companions were absent. Companion communication was largely emotional and facilitative, as measured by RIAS. Companion presence was associated with more surgeon talk (IRR 1.29, p = 0.006), and medical information-giving (IRR 1.41, p = 0.001). Companion presence was associated with less disclosure of lifestyle/psychosocial topics by patients (IRR 0.55, p = 0.037). In adjusted analyses, companions' presence was associated with lower levels of patient-centeredness (IRR 0.77, p 0.004). There were no differences in patient or surgeon satisfaction based on companion presence. Conclusion: Companions' presence during pre-surgical visits was associated with patient-surgeon communication but was not associated with patient or surgeon satisfaction. Practice implications: Future work is needed to develop interventions to enhance patient-companion-provider interactions in this setting.

AB - Objective: To examine the association between family companion presence during pre-surgical visits to discuss major cancer surgery and patient-provider communication and satisfaction. Methods: Secondary analysis of 61 pre-surgical visit recordings with eight surgical oncologists at an academic tertiary care hospital using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Surgeons, patients, and companions completed post-visit satisfaction questionnaires. Poisson and logistic regression models assessed differences in communication and satisfaction when companions were present vs. absent. Results: There were 46 visits (75%) in which companions were present, and 15 (25%) in which companions were absent. Companion communication was largely emotional and facilitative, as measured by RIAS. Companion presence was associated with more surgeon talk (IRR 1.29, p = 0.006), and medical information-giving (IRR 1.41, p = 0.001). Companion presence was associated with less disclosure of lifestyle/psychosocial topics by patients (IRR 0.55, p = 0.037). In adjusted analyses, companions' presence was associated with lower levels of patient-centeredness (IRR 0.77, p 0.004). There were no differences in patient or surgeon satisfaction based on companion presence. Conclusion: Companions' presence during pre-surgical visits was associated with patient-surgeon communication but was not associated with patient or surgeon satisfaction. Practice implications: Future work is needed to develop interventions to enhance patient-companion-provider interactions in this setting.

KW - Cancer

KW - Companion

KW - Family caregiver

KW - Patient-provider communication

KW - Surgery

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