Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome

The ARIC study

A. D. Liese, E. J. Mayer-Davis, H. A. Tyroler, C. E. Davis, U. Keil, M. I. Schmidt, F. L. Brancati, G. Heiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The association of a parental history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the multiple metabolic syndrome (MMS) was studied in a population survey of middle-aged adults. The eligible population was drawn from the baseline examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, a population-based, bi-ethnic, multi-centre cohort study. The MMS was defined as a multivariate, categorical phenotype of co-occurring diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. MMS cases (n = 356) were compared to disorder-free control subjects (n = 6797) with respect to their parental history of diabetes and hypertension. MMS cases were more likely to report a history of diabetes in both parents (odds ratio [OR] 4.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-14.7) or a history of hypertension in both parents (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.0) than control subjects, adjusting for BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, age, gender, and ethnicity/centre. A parental history of diabetes and hypertension in both parents was associated with the greatest increase in odds of MMS (OR 8.3, 95% CI 3.0-22.8). A dose-response relationship between the number of parental disorders (one; two; three to four) and the odds of MMS was observed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.7; OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-2.8; OR 4.0, 95% CI 2.5-6.2). Based on the marked associations observed between a parental history of MMS components and the clustering of these metabolic disorders in the offspring generation, we conclude that genetic and/or non-genetic familial influences play a role in the development of the multiple metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)963-970
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetologia
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Parents
Population
Waist-Hip Ratio
Dyslipidemias
Cluster Analysis
Atherosclerosis
Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Insulin resistance syndrome
  • Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
  • Parental history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Liese, A. D., Mayer-Davis, E. J., Tyroler, H. A., Davis, C. E., Keil, U., Schmidt, M. I., ... Heiss, G. (1997). Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome: The ARIC study. Diabetologia, 40(8), 963-970. https://doi.org/10.1007/s001250050775

Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome : The ARIC study. / Liese, A. D.; Mayer-Davis, E. J.; Tyroler, H. A.; Davis, C. E.; Keil, U.; Schmidt, M. I.; Brancati, F. L.; Heiss, G.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 40, No. 8, 1997, p. 963-970.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liese, AD, Mayer-Davis, EJ, Tyroler, HA, Davis, CE, Keil, U, Schmidt, MI, Brancati, FL & Heiss, G 1997, 'Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome: The ARIC study', Diabetologia, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 963-970. https://doi.org/10.1007/s001250050775
Liese AD, Mayer-Davis EJ, Tyroler HA, Davis CE, Keil U, Schmidt MI et al. Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome: The ARIC study. Diabetologia. 1997;40(8):963-970. https://doi.org/10.1007/s001250050775
Liese, A. D. ; Mayer-Davis, E. J. ; Tyroler, H. A. ; Davis, C. E. ; Keil, U. ; Schmidt, M. I. ; Brancati, F. L. ; Heiss, G. / Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome : The ARIC study. In: Diabetologia. 1997 ; Vol. 40, No. 8. pp. 963-970.
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abstract = "The association of a parental history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the multiple metabolic syndrome (MMS) was studied in a population survey of middle-aged adults. The eligible population was drawn from the baseline examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, a population-based, bi-ethnic, multi-centre cohort study. The MMS was defined as a multivariate, categorical phenotype of co-occurring diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. MMS cases (n = 356) were compared to disorder-free control subjects (n = 6797) with respect to their parental history of diabetes and hypertension. MMS cases were more likely to report a history of diabetes in both parents (odds ratio [OR] 4.7, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.5-14.7) or a history of hypertension in both parents (OR 1.9, 95{\%} CI 1.1-3.0) than control subjects, adjusting for BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, age, gender, and ethnicity/centre. A parental history of diabetes and hypertension in both parents was associated with the greatest increase in odds of MMS (OR 8.3, 95{\%} CI 3.0-22.8). A dose-response relationship between the number of parental disorders (one; two; three to four) and the odds of MMS was observed (OR 1.2, 95{\%} CI 0.9-1.7; OR 2.0, 95{\%} CI 1.4-2.8; OR 4.0, 95{\%} CI 2.5-6.2). Based on the marked associations observed between a parental history of MMS components and the clustering of these metabolic disorders in the offspring generation, we conclude that genetic and/or non-genetic familial influences play a role in the development of the multiple metabolic syndrome.",
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