False Recognition in Triazolam-Induced Amnesia

Miriam Z. Mintzer, Roland R Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Acute administration of the benzodiazepine hypnotic drug triazolam (Halcion) induces temporary amnesia. The present double-blind, placebo-controlled repeated-measures study using the Deese (1959)/Roediger-McDermott (1995) false recognition paradigm examined triazolam's (0.25 mg/70 kg) interaction with two variables, both designed to decrease false recognition rates under nondrug conditions, but via different mechanisms. As predicted, an interaction between drug condition and number of study presentations (Experiment 1; N = 18) was observed such that participants exhibited decreased false recognition rates for twice- vs. once-presented lists in the placebo condition but increased false recognition rates for twice- vs. once-presented lists in the triazolam condition. In contrast, as predicted, parallel effects of number of studied associates (Experiment 2; N = 18) as a function of drug condition were observed such that participants exhibited decreased false recognition rates for 6- vs. 15-associate lists in both placebo and triazolam conditions. These results suggest that triazolam-treated participants rely primarily on gist-based memory mechanisms and are unable to use item-specific memory mechanisms to suppress false recognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-492
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2001

Fingerprint

Triazolam
Amnesia
Drug interactions
drug
Data storage equipment
Experiments
experiment
Placebos
interaction
paradigm
present
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Benzodiazepines
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Recognition (Psychology)
False Recognition
Placebo
Drugs

Keywords

  • Benzodiazepine
  • False recognition
  • Memory
  • Triazolam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

False Recognition in Triazolam-Induced Amnesia. / Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Griffiths, Roland R.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 44, No. 3, 04.2001, p. 475-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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