Factors contributing to depression in latinas of Mexican origin residing in the United States: Implications for nurses

Mona Shattell, Katherine M. Smith, Ann Quinlan-Colwell, José A. Villalba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Latinas experience more depression and are less likely to receive mental health support than White women or African American women. Objective: This article synthesizes the research on depression in adult Latinas of Mexican origin residing in the United States. Study Design: MEDLINE (PubMed), The Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and PsycINFO databases for the years 2000 through 2008 were searched using the keywords Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Mexican American, Mexican immigrant, women, and depression. Results: The process of acculturation and associated stressors may have a negative effect on the mental health of women of Mexican origin residing in the United States. Separation from family, harmful interpersonal relationships, unmet economic needs, conflict, and isolation may contribute to depression in this population. Conclusions: More research is needed on the influence of family and economic strain as well as the effectiveness of assessments and interventions for depression in Mexican and Mexican American women, especially for those living in emerging Latina/o immigrant communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-204
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Nurses
Depression
Mental Health
Economics
Acculturation
Research
PubMed
MEDLINE
African Americans
Nursing
Databases
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Hispanic
  • Latinas
  • Mexican
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

Factors contributing to depression in latinas of Mexican origin residing in the United States : Implications for nurses. / Shattell, Mona; Smith, Katherine M.; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Villalba, José A.

In: Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.06.2008, p. 193-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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