Factors associated with prevalent hepatitis C infection among HIV-infected women with No reported history of injection drug use: The women's interagency HIV study (WIHS)

Toni Frederick, Pamela Burian, Norah Terrault, Mardge Cohen, Michael Augenbraun, Mary Young, Eric Seaberg, Jessica Justman, Alexandra M. Levine, Wendy J. MacK, Andrea Kovacs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although the primary mode of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission is exposure to blood products or injection drug use (IDU), studies have found varying independent risk factors for HCV infection among persons with no history of IDU or exposure to blood products. For HIV-infected women, sexual transmission may be another potential source of HCV infection. HIV-infected and HIV-negative women at risk for HIV enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) during October 1994 to November 1995 and again between October 2001 and November 2002 were studied. Clinical and demographic factors associated with HCV seroprevalence were assessed in multivariate logistic regression models controlling for history of blood transfusion and IDU. Among 3636 women with HCV results, 31.5% were HCV antibody positive (HCV+) including 13.5% with no reported history of IDU or blood transfusions. Multivariate logistic regression analyses stratified on IDU showed that among women with no history of IDU, sex with an IDU male was independently associated with HCV positivity (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, 95% confidence [CI]=2.1, 3.8, p<0.0001) after controlling for blood transfusion, age, HIV infection, unemployment, birth in the United States, history of hepatitis B infection, and current smoking status. Further stratification on HIV status showed that the association was significant only for the HIV+ (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.3, 2.7, p=0.0007) compared to the HIV- women (OR=1.1, 95% CI=0.4, 2.7) although these odds ratios were not significantly different (p=0.25). For HIV-positive women with no reported history of IDU, sex with an IDU male was independently associated with HCV suggesting that sexual transmission may be an important mode of HCV transmission for these high-risk women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-923
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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