Factors Associated With Loss of Usual Source of Care Among Older Adults

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: Access to a usual source of care (USC) is associated with better preventive health and chronic disease treatment. Although most older adults have a USC, loss of USC, and factors associated with loss of USC, have not previously been examined. METHODS: We followed 7,609 participants of the National Health and Aging Trends Study annually for up to 6 years (2011-2016). Discrete time-to-event techniques and pooled logistic regression were used to identify demographic, clinical, and social factors associated with loss of USC. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent of older adults reported having a USC in 2011, of whom 5% subsequently did not. Odds of losing a USC were higher among older adults with unmet transportation needs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.67), who moved to a new residence (aOR 2.08), and who reported depressive symptoms (aOR 1.40). Odds of losing a USC were lower for those who had ≥4 chronic conditions (vs 0-1; aOR 0.42) and with supplemental (aOR 0.52) or Medicaid (aOR 0.67) insurance coverage. CONCLUSIONS: We identified factors associated with older adults' loss of a USC. Potentially modifiable factors, such as access to transportation and supplemental insurance, deserve further investigation to potentially assist older adults with continuous access to care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-545
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Family Medicine
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Odds Ratio
Insurance Coverage
Medicaid
Health
Insurance
Chronic Disease
Logistic Models
Demography
Depression

Keywords

  • access to care
  • aging
  • continuity of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

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title = "Factors Associated With Loss of Usual Source of Care Among Older Adults",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Access to a usual source of care (USC) is associated with better preventive health and chronic disease treatment. Although most older adults have a USC, loss of USC, and factors associated with loss of USC, have not previously been examined. METHODS: We followed 7,609 participants of the National Health and Aging Trends Study annually for up to 6 years (2011-2016). Discrete time-to-event techniques and pooled logistic regression were used to identify demographic, clinical, and social factors associated with loss of USC. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent of older adults reported having a USC in 2011, of whom 5{\%} subsequently did not. Odds of losing a USC were higher among older adults with unmet transportation needs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.67), who moved to a new residence (aOR 2.08), and who reported depressive symptoms (aOR 1.40). Odds of losing a USC were lower for those who had ≥4 chronic conditions (vs 0-1; aOR 0.42) and with supplemental (aOR 0.52) or Medicaid (aOR 0.67) insurance coverage. CONCLUSIONS: We identified factors associated with older adults' loss of a USC. Potentially modifiable factors, such as access to transportation and supplemental insurance, deserve further investigation to potentially assist older adults with continuous access to care.",
keywords = "access to care, aging, continuity of care",
author = "Stephanie Nothelle and Cynthia Boyd and Orla Sheehan and Jennifer Wolff",
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AU - Nothelle, Stephanie

AU - Boyd, Cynthia

AU - Sheehan, Orla

AU - Wolff, Jennifer

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N2 - PURPOSE: Access to a usual source of care (USC) is associated with better preventive health and chronic disease treatment. Although most older adults have a USC, loss of USC, and factors associated with loss of USC, have not previously been examined. METHODS: We followed 7,609 participants of the National Health and Aging Trends Study annually for up to 6 years (2011-2016). Discrete time-to-event techniques and pooled logistic regression were used to identify demographic, clinical, and social factors associated with loss of USC. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent of older adults reported having a USC in 2011, of whom 5% subsequently did not. Odds of losing a USC were higher among older adults with unmet transportation needs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.67), who moved to a new residence (aOR 2.08), and who reported depressive symptoms (aOR 1.40). Odds of losing a USC were lower for those who had ≥4 chronic conditions (vs 0-1; aOR 0.42) and with supplemental (aOR 0.52) or Medicaid (aOR 0.67) insurance coverage. CONCLUSIONS: We identified factors associated with older adults' loss of a USC. Potentially modifiable factors, such as access to transportation and supplemental insurance, deserve further investigation to potentially assist older adults with continuous access to care.

AB - PURPOSE: Access to a usual source of care (USC) is associated with better preventive health and chronic disease treatment. Although most older adults have a USC, loss of USC, and factors associated with loss of USC, have not previously been examined. METHODS: We followed 7,609 participants of the National Health and Aging Trends Study annually for up to 6 years (2011-2016). Discrete time-to-event techniques and pooled logistic regression were used to identify demographic, clinical, and social factors associated with loss of USC. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent of older adults reported having a USC in 2011, of whom 5% subsequently did not. Odds of losing a USC were higher among older adults with unmet transportation needs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.67), who moved to a new residence (aOR 2.08), and who reported depressive symptoms (aOR 1.40). Odds of losing a USC were lower for those who had ≥4 chronic conditions (vs 0-1; aOR 0.42) and with supplemental (aOR 0.52) or Medicaid (aOR 0.67) insurance coverage. CONCLUSIONS: We identified factors associated with older adults' loss of a USC. Potentially modifiable factors, such as access to transportation and supplemental insurance, deserve further investigation to potentially assist older adults with continuous access to care.

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