Factors associated with female provider preference among African American women, and implications for Breast cancer screening

Dana M. Casciotti, Ann C. Klassen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Globally, breast cancer incidence is increasing. Early detection remains important for addressing disparities, including among U.S. minorities. Seeing a female physician increases screening, but the effects of unmet provider gender preference among underserved populations remain unexplored. Among 576 urban African American women age 45-93, we examined predictors of gender preference and how met and unmet preference influenced screening. We conclude that provider gender is a "double-edged sword." We saw a female provider screening benefit, but also that gender preference was associated with past disadvantage and attitudes inconsistent with health maintenance. Provider gender preference merits further consideration in women's health research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-598
Number of pages18
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint

Early Detection of Cancer
African Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Women's Health
Vulnerable Populations
Physicians
Incidence
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Factors associated with female provider preference among African American women, and implications for Breast cancer screening. / Casciotti, Dana M.; Klassen, Ann C.

In: Health Care for Women International, Vol. 32, No. 7, 07.2011, p. 581-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ed7586c50e344b28a004d992ab833e0d,
title = "Factors associated with female provider preference among African American women, and implications for Breast cancer screening",
abstract = "Globally, breast cancer incidence is increasing. Early detection remains important for addressing disparities, including among U.S. minorities. Seeing a female physician increases screening, but the effects of unmet provider gender preference among underserved populations remain unexplored. Among 576 urban African American women age 45-93, we examined predictors of gender preference and how met and unmet preference influenced screening. We conclude that provider gender is a {"}double-edged sword.{"} We saw a female provider screening benefit, but also that gender preference was associated with past disadvantage and attitudes inconsistent with health maintenance. Provider gender preference merits further consideration in women's health research.",
author = "Casciotti, {Dana M.} and Klassen, {Ann C.}",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1080/07399332.2011.565527",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "581--598",
journal = "Health Care for Women International",
issn = "0739-9332",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors associated with female provider preference among African American women, and implications for Breast cancer screening

AU - Casciotti, Dana M.

AU - Klassen, Ann C.

PY - 2011/7

Y1 - 2011/7

N2 - Globally, breast cancer incidence is increasing. Early detection remains important for addressing disparities, including among U.S. minorities. Seeing a female physician increases screening, but the effects of unmet provider gender preference among underserved populations remain unexplored. Among 576 urban African American women age 45-93, we examined predictors of gender preference and how met and unmet preference influenced screening. We conclude that provider gender is a "double-edged sword." We saw a female provider screening benefit, but also that gender preference was associated with past disadvantage and attitudes inconsistent with health maintenance. Provider gender preference merits further consideration in women's health research.

AB - Globally, breast cancer incidence is increasing. Early detection remains important for addressing disparities, including among U.S. minorities. Seeing a female physician increases screening, but the effects of unmet provider gender preference among underserved populations remain unexplored. Among 576 urban African American women age 45-93, we examined predictors of gender preference and how met and unmet preference influenced screening. We conclude that provider gender is a "double-edged sword." We saw a female provider screening benefit, but also that gender preference was associated with past disadvantage and attitudes inconsistent with health maintenance. Provider gender preference merits further consideration in women's health research.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960354462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960354462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07399332.2011.565527

DO - 10.1080/07399332.2011.565527

M3 - Article

C2 - 21728881

AN - SCOPUS:79960354462

VL - 32

SP - 581

EP - 598

JO - Health Care for Women International

JF - Health Care for Women International

SN - 0739-9332

IS - 7

ER -