Factors associated with domperidone use as a galactogogue at an australian tertiary teaching hospital

Luke E. Grzeskowiak, Julia A. Dalton, Andrea L. Fielder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Insufficient milk supply is 1 of the most commonly reported reasons for discontinuation of infant breastfeeding. Although domperidone is often used to improve milk supply, knowledge of factors associated with the use of domperidone in clinical practice is scarce. Objective: This study aimed to examine factors associated with the use of domperidone as a galactogogue at the Womens and Childrens Hospital (WCH), Adelaide. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted, involving women who delivered live-born singletons (N = 21 914) at the WCH between January 2004 and December 2008. Women dispensed domperidone were identified using WCH pharmacy dispensing records. Maternal and infant clinical data were obtained from the WCH Perinatal Statistics Collection. Relationships between maternal/infant demographic and clinical variables and the use of domperidone were examined through univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Key factors associated with an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone were increasing maternal age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.06), maternal obesity (aOR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16- 1.77), primiparity (aOR = 1.94; 95% CI, 1.63-2.30), delivery by cesarean section (aOR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55), preterm birth (aOR = 3.54; 95% CI, 2.79-4.50), and neonatal hospitalization (aOR = 2.51; 95% CI, 2.01-3.14). In addition, statistically significant trends were observed between increasing socioeconomic status and year of delivery and an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone (all Ps <.004). Conclusion: These findings are of clinical importance as they not only reinforce previous findings regarding risk factors for women experiencing lactation difficulties but also highlight the need for improved research regarding the rational and efficacious use of domperidone to improve breastfeeding outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-253
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 22 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Domperidone
Tertiary Care Centers
Teaching Hospitals
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Mothers
Breast Feeding
Milk
Premature Birth
Maternal Age
Parity
Lactation
Social Class
Cesarean Section
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Obesity
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • breastfeeding
  • breastfeeding difficulties
  • domperidone
  • epidemiology
  • galactogogue
  • observational study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Factors associated with domperidone use as a galactogogue at an australian tertiary teaching hospital. / Grzeskowiak, Luke E.; Dalton, Julia A.; Fielder, Andrea L.

In: Journal of Human Lactation, Vol. 31, No. 2, 22.05.2015, p. 249-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grzeskowiak, Luke E. ; Dalton, Julia A. ; Fielder, Andrea L. / Factors associated with domperidone use as a galactogogue at an australian tertiary teaching hospital. In: Journal of Human Lactation. 2015 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 249-253.
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abstract = "Background: Insufficient milk supply is 1 of the most commonly reported reasons for discontinuation of infant breastfeeding. Although domperidone is often used to improve milk supply, knowledge of factors associated with the use of domperidone in clinical practice is scarce. Objective: This study aimed to examine factors associated with the use of domperidone as a galactogogue at the Womens and Childrens Hospital (WCH), Adelaide. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted, involving women who delivered live-born singletons (N = 21 914) at the WCH between January 2004 and December 2008. Women dispensed domperidone were identified using WCH pharmacy dispensing records. Maternal and infant clinical data were obtained from the WCH Perinatal Statistics Collection. Relationships between maternal/infant demographic and clinical variables and the use of domperidone were examined through univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Key factors associated with an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone were increasing maternal age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.04; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.06), maternal obesity (aOR = 1.41; 95{\%} CI, 1.16- 1.77), primiparity (aOR = 1.94; 95{\%} CI, 1.63-2.30), delivery by cesarean section (aOR = 1.31; 95{\%} CI, 1.10-1.55), preterm birth (aOR = 3.54; 95{\%} CI, 2.79-4.50), and neonatal hospitalization (aOR = 2.51; 95{\%} CI, 2.01-3.14). In addition, statistically significant trends were observed between increasing socioeconomic status and year of delivery and an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone (all Ps <.004). Conclusion: These findings are of clinical importance as they not only reinforce previous findings regarding risk factors for women experiencing lactation difficulties but also highlight the need for improved research regarding the rational and efficacious use of domperidone to improve breastfeeding outcomes.",
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N2 - Background: Insufficient milk supply is 1 of the most commonly reported reasons for discontinuation of infant breastfeeding. Although domperidone is often used to improve milk supply, knowledge of factors associated with the use of domperidone in clinical practice is scarce. Objective: This study aimed to examine factors associated with the use of domperidone as a galactogogue at the Womens and Childrens Hospital (WCH), Adelaide. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted, involving women who delivered live-born singletons (N = 21 914) at the WCH between January 2004 and December 2008. Women dispensed domperidone were identified using WCH pharmacy dispensing records. Maternal and infant clinical data were obtained from the WCH Perinatal Statistics Collection. Relationships between maternal/infant demographic and clinical variables and the use of domperidone were examined through univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Key factors associated with an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone were increasing maternal age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.06), maternal obesity (aOR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16- 1.77), primiparity (aOR = 1.94; 95% CI, 1.63-2.30), delivery by cesarean section (aOR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55), preterm birth (aOR = 3.54; 95% CI, 2.79-4.50), and neonatal hospitalization (aOR = 2.51; 95% CI, 2.01-3.14). In addition, statistically significant trends were observed between increasing socioeconomic status and year of delivery and an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone (all Ps <.004). Conclusion: These findings are of clinical importance as they not only reinforce previous findings regarding risk factors for women experiencing lactation difficulties but also highlight the need for improved research regarding the rational and efficacious use of domperidone to improve breastfeeding outcomes.

AB - Background: Insufficient milk supply is 1 of the most commonly reported reasons for discontinuation of infant breastfeeding. Although domperidone is often used to improve milk supply, knowledge of factors associated with the use of domperidone in clinical practice is scarce. Objective: This study aimed to examine factors associated with the use of domperidone as a galactogogue at the Womens and Childrens Hospital (WCH), Adelaide. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted, involving women who delivered live-born singletons (N = 21 914) at the WCH between January 2004 and December 2008. Women dispensed domperidone were identified using WCH pharmacy dispensing records. Maternal and infant clinical data were obtained from the WCH Perinatal Statistics Collection. Relationships between maternal/infant demographic and clinical variables and the use of domperidone were examined through univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Key factors associated with an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone were increasing maternal age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.06), maternal obesity (aOR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16- 1.77), primiparity (aOR = 1.94; 95% CI, 1.63-2.30), delivery by cesarean section (aOR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55), preterm birth (aOR = 3.54; 95% CI, 2.79-4.50), and neonatal hospitalization (aOR = 2.51; 95% CI, 2.01-3.14). In addition, statistically significant trends were observed between increasing socioeconomic status and year of delivery and an increased likelihood of women receiving domperidone (all Ps <.004). Conclusion: These findings are of clinical importance as they not only reinforce previous findings regarding risk factors for women experiencing lactation difficulties but also highlight the need for improved research regarding the rational and efficacious use of domperidone to improve breastfeeding outcomes.

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