Factors affecting outcome in a school mental health service

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The teacher-rated outcome on 70 consecutive school mental health referrals treated with brief psychiatric therapy was obtained. The major clinical and outcome findings were (1) 40% of the children showed a hyperactive-learning impaired pattern: (2) the use of stimulant medication for the majority of this group resulted in dramatic classroom improvement; (3) time-limited therapy for academically retarded, chronically misbehaving children produced limited classroom benefits; (4) parental antagonism toward school authorities was frequently related to student suspensions; (5) the child's IQ was a significantly (positive) outcome factor; (6) persistence in treatment was significantly greater when medication was prescribed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-32
Number of pages9
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1974

Fingerprint

School Health Services
Mental Health Services
health service
mental health
medication
school
classroom
antagonism
Psychiatry
persistence
Suspensions
Mental Health
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation
Learning
Students
teacher
learning
Group
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Factors affecting outcome in a school mental health service. / Safer, Daniel J.

In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 10, No. 1, 03.1974, p. 24-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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