Facility disparities in reporting comorbidities to the National Trauma Data Bank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) includes patient comorbidities. This study evaluates factors of trauma centers associated with higher rates of missing comorbidity data. Methods: Proportions of missing comorbidity data from facilities in the NTDB from 2011 to 2014 were evaluated for associations with facility characteristics. Proportional impact analysis was performed to identify potential policy targets. Results: Of 919 included facilities, 85% reported comorbidity data in 95% or more cases; only 31.3% were missing no data. Missing rates were significantly different based on most facility categories, but independently associated only with hospital size, region, and trauma center level. Only 15% of centers were responsible for over 80% of cases missing data. Conclusions: There is significant nonrandom variation in reporting trauma patient comorbidities to the NTDB. Missing data needs to be recognized and considered in studies of trauma comorbidities. Targeted intervention may improve data quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Comorbidity
Databases
Wounds and Injuries
Trauma Centers
Health Facility Size

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{eba2ba01174343828a7effa14ea79653,
title = "Facility disparities in reporting comorbidities to the National Trauma Data Bank",
abstract = "Background: The National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) includes patient comorbidities. This study evaluates factors of trauma centers associated with higher rates of missing comorbidity data. Methods: Proportions of missing comorbidity data from facilities in the NTDB from 2011 to 2014 were evaluated for associations with facility characteristics. Proportional impact analysis was performed to identify potential policy targets. Results: Of 919 included facilities, 85{\%} reported comorbidity data in 95{\%} or more cases; only 31.3{\%} were missing no data. Missing rates were significantly different based on most facility categories, but independently associated only with hospital size, region, and trauma center level. Only 15{\%} of centers were responsible for over 80{\%} of cases missing data. Conclusions: There is significant nonrandom variation in reporting trauma patient comorbidities to the NTDB. Missing data needs to be recognized and considered in studies of trauma comorbidities. Targeted intervention may improve data quality.",
author = "Ryan Fransman and Alistair Kent and Elliott Haut and Anuradha Kar and Joseph Sakran and Stevens, {Kent A} and Efron, {David Thomas} and Christian Jones",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.01.031",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Facility disparities in reporting comorbidities to the National Trauma Data Bank

AU - Fransman, Ryan

AU - Kent, Alistair

AU - Haut, Elliott

AU - Kar, Anuradha

AU - Sakran, Joseph

AU - Stevens, Kent A

AU - Efron, David Thomas

AU - Jones, Christian

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: The National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) includes patient comorbidities. This study evaluates factors of trauma centers associated with higher rates of missing comorbidity data. Methods: Proportions of missing comorbidity data from facilities in the NTDB from 2011 to 2014 were evaluated for associations with facility characteristics. Proportional impact analysis was performed to identify potential policy targets. Results: Of 919 included facilities, 85% reported comorbidity data in 95% or more cases; only 31.3% were missing no data. Missing rates were significantly different based on most facility categories, but independently associated only with hospital size, region, and trauma center level. Only 15% of centers were responsible for over 80% of cases missing data. Conclusions: There is significant nonrandom variation in reporting trauma patient comorbidities to the NTDB. Missing data needs to be recognized and considered in studies of trauma comorbidities. Targeted intervention may improve data quality.

AB - Background: The National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) includes patient comorbidities. This study evaluates factors of trauma centers associated with higher rates of missing comorbidity data. Methods: Proportions of missing comorbidity data from facilities in the NTDB from 2011 to 2014 were evaluated for associations with facility characteristics. Proportional impact analysis was performed to identify potential policy targets. Results: Of 919 included facilities, 85% reported comorbidity data in 95% or more cases; only 31.3% were missing no data. Missing rates were significantly different based on most facility categories, but independently associated only with hospital size, region, and trauma center level. Only 15% of centers were responsible for over 80% of cases missing data. Conclusions: There is significant nonrandom variation in reporting trauma patient comorbidities to the NTDB. Missing data needs to be recognized and considered in studies of trauma comorbidities. Targeted intervention may improve data quality.

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