Facilitators and barriers to adopting robotic-assisted surgery

Contextualizing the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology

Christine BenMessaoud, Hadi H K Kharrazi, Karl F. MacDorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Robotic-assisted surgical techniques are not yet well established among surgeon practice groups beyond a few surgical subspecialties. To help identify the facilitators and barriers to their adoption, this belief-elicitation study contextualized and supplemented constructs of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) in robotic-assisted surgery. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 21 surgeons comprising two groups: users and nonusers. The main facilitators to adoption were Perceived Usefulness and Facilitating Conditions among both users and nonusers, followed by Attitude Toward Using Technology among users and Extrinsic Motivation among nonusers. The three main barriers to adoption for both users and nonusers were Perceived Ease of Use and Complexity, Perceived Usefulness, and Perceived Behavioral Control. This study's findings can assist surgeons, hospital and medical school administrators, and other policy makers on the proper adoption of robotic-assisted surgery and can guide future research on the development of theories and framing of hypotheses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere16395
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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surgeons
Robotics
Surgery
surgery
Technology
Administrative Personnel
development theory
Medical Schools
Motivation
interviews
Interviews
Research
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Facilitators and barriers to adopting robotic-assisted surgery : Contextualizing the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology. / BenMessaoud, Christine; Kharrazi, Hadi H K; MacDorman, Karl F.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 1, e16395, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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