Extreme chromosome 17 copy number instability is a prognostic factor in patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: A retrospective cohort study

Jacqueline E. Birkness, Neal G. Spada, Caitlyn Miller, James D. Luketich, Katie S. Nason, Weijing Sun, Jon M. Davison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gastric and esophageal cancers frequently show genomic instability and aneuploidy. Chromosomal copy number instability (CIN) is a form of genomic instability that exerts pleiotropic effects on cellular biology and is a source of genetic heterogeneity in a population of cells. CIN results in cell-to-cell variation in chromosome copy number which can be detected and quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). CIN is a biomarker associated with differential response to a number of chemotherapy compounds. We quantified chromosome 17 copy number instability (CIN-17) in 348 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by centromeric FISH in cases that were tested for HER2 amplification. We evaluated the association between CIN-17 and clinical outcome after surgical and nonsurgical treatment. CIN-17 was detected in 45.4% (158/348) and extreme CIN-17 in 28.4% (99/348). Extreme CIN-17 had no association with outcome in surgically treated patients. However, in patients treated with conventional radiation and/or chemotherapy, extreme CIN-17 was associated with 55% reduction in overall mortality (hazard ratio, 0.448; 95% confidence interval, 0.263–0.763) after adjusting for age and clinical stage at diagnosis. Extreme CIN-17 is detected in over a quarter of gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas and is a favorable prognostic marker in patients treated nonoperatively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalGenes Chromosomes and Cancer
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

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