Expression of activation markers on basophils in a controlled model of anaphylaxis

Laura M. Gober, John A. Eckman, Patricia M. Sterba, Kavitha Vasagar, John Thomas Schroeder, David B K Golden, Sarbjit S Saini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Anaphylaxis has variable clinical presentations and lacks reliable biomarkers. Expression of activation markers on basophils has been useful in assessing sensitization in IgE-mediated diseases but has not been examined in vivo in anaphylaxis. Objective: The study's goals were to assess the baseline expression of activation markers on basophils in individuals with a sting reaction history, the degree of change in expression of these markers after intentional sting challenge, and the relationship between in vitro and in vivo activation marker expression. Methods: Patients allergic to insect venom were enrolled and grouped by clinical category defined by a history of a systemic or large local reaction and use of venom immunotherapy. Blood was collected before and after sting challenge. Enriched basophils were analyzed for activation marker expression. In select subjects, basophils were examined after in vitro stimulation with insect venom for activation marker expression and histamine release. Results: Of 35 sting-challenge participants, 21 provided adequate samples for analysis. Pre-sting basophil CD63 expression was significantly higher in systemic reactors on immunotherapy. Following sting challenge, the rise in basophil CD69 expression and CD203c was significantly higher in systemic reactors on immunotherapy. Levels of activation markers on basophils were greater after in vitro venom stimulation than after in vivo challenge. Conclusion: Broader shifts in expression of basophil activation markers after in vivo challenge occurred among subjects with a history of in vivo systemic anaphylaxis despite venom immunotherapy. Clinical implications: Basophil activation markers may be potential biomarkers for anaphylaxis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1181-1188
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume119
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Basophils
Anaphylaxis
Bites and Stings
Venoms
Immunotherapy
Insects
Biomarkers
Histamine Release
Immunoglobulin E
History

Keywords

  • activation marker
  • Anaphylaxis
  • basophil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Expression of activation markers on basophils in a controlled model of anaphylaxis. / Gober, Laura M.; Eckman, John A.; Sterba, Patricia M.; Vasagar, Kavitha; Schroeder, John Thomas; Golden, David B K; Saini, Sarbjit S.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 119, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 1181-1188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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