Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro

Raymond R. Raylman, Anaira C. Clavo, Richard L. Wahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Proposals to enhance the amount of radiation dose delivered to small tumors with radioimmunotherapy by constraining emitted electrons with very strong homogeneous static magnetic fields has renewed interest in the cellular effects of prolonged exposures to such fields. Past investigations have not studied the effects on tumor cell growth of lengthy exposures to very high magnetic fields. Three malignant human cell lines, HTB 63 (melanoma), HTB 77 IP3 (ovarian carcinoma), and CCL 86 (lymphoma; Raji cells), were exposed to a 7 Tesla uniform static magnetic field for 64 hours. Following exposure, the number of viable cells in each group was determined. In addition, multicycle flow cytometry was performed on all cell lines, and pulsed-field electrophoresis was performed solely on Raji cells to investigate changes in cell cycle patterns and the possibility of DNA fragmentation induced by the magnetic field. A 64 h exposure to the magnetic field produced a reduction in viable cell number in each of the three cell lines. Reductions of 19.04 ± 7.32%, 22.06 ± 6.19%, and 40.68 ± 8.31% were measured for the melanoma. ovarian carcinoma. and lymphoma cell lines, respectively, vs. control groups not exposed to the magnetic field. Multicycle flow cytometry revealed that the cell cycle was largely unaltered. Pulsed-field electrophoresis analysis revealed no increase in DNA breaks related to magnetic field exposure. In conclusion, prolonged exposure to a very strong magnetic field appeared to inhibit the growth of three human tumor cell lines in vitro. The mechanism underlying this effect has not, as yet, been identified, although alteration of cell growth cycle and gross fragmentation of DNA have been excluded as possible contributory factors. Future investigations of this phenomenon may have a significant impact on the future understanding and treatment of cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-363
Number of pages6
JournalBioelectromagnetics
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

human growth
Magnetic Fields
magnetic fields
Growth
Neoplasms
cell lines
Cell Line
Cell Cycle
DNA fragmentation
DNA Fragmentation
pulsed-field gel electrophoresis
melanoma
lymphoma
carcinoma
flow cytometry
Electrophoresis
cell growth
Melanoma
cell cycle
Lymphoma

Keywords

  • Biophysics
  • Cellular growth
  • Human cancer cells
  • Magnetic fields
  • Magnetobiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Raylman, R. R., Clavo, A. C., & Wahl, R. L. (1996). Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro. Bioelectromagnetics, 17(5), 358-363.

Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro. / Raylman, Raymond R.; Clavo, Anaira C.; Wahl, Richard L.

In: Bioelectromagnetics, Vol. 17, No. 5, 1996, p. 358-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raylman, RR, Clavo, AC & Wahl, RL 1996, 'Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro', Bioelectromagnetics, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 358-363.
Raylman, Raymond R. ; Clavo, Anaira C. ; Wahl, Richard L. / Exposure to strong static magnetic field slows the growth of human cancer cells in vitro. In: Bioelectromagnetics. 1996 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 358-363.
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