Exposure to electromagnetic fields from use of electric blankets and other in-home electrical appliances and breast cancer risk

Tongzhang Zheng, Theodore R. Holford, Susan Taylor Mayne, Patricia Hansen Owens, Bing Zhang, Peter Boyle, Darryl Carter, Barbara Ward, Yawei Zhang, Shelia Hoar Zahm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from use of electric blankets and other in-home electrical appliances has been hypothesized to increase breast cancer risk. To test the hypothesis, the authors analyzed data from a case-control study of female breast cancer conducted in Connecticut in 1994- 1997. A total of 608 incident breast cancer patients and 609 age frequency- matched controls, 31-85 years old, were interviewed by trained study interviewers using a standardized, structured questionnaire to obtain information on lifetime use of various in-home electrical appliances. A total of 40% of the cases and 43% of the controls reported regular use of electric blankets in their lifetime, which gave an adjusted odds ratio of 0.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 1.1). For those who reported using electric blankets continuously throughout the night, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.7, 1.2) when compared with never users. The risk did not vary according to age at first use, duration of use, or menopausal and estrogen receptor status. The authors also did not find an association between use of other major in-home electrical appliances and breast cancer risk. In conclusion, exposure to EMFs from in-home electrical appliance use was not found to increase breast cancer risk in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1103-1111
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume151
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jun 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electromagnetic Fields
Breast Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Estrogen Receptors
Case-Control Studies
Interviews

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Case-control studies
  • Electromagnetic fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Zheng, T., Holford, T. R., Mayne, S. T., Owens, P. H., Zhang, B., Boyle, P., ... Zahm, S. H. (2000). Exposure to electromagnetic fields from use of electric blankets and other in-home electrical appliances and breast cancer risk. American Journal of Epidemiology, 151(11), 1103-1111.

Exposure to electromagnetic fields from use of electric blankets and other in-home electrical appliances and breast cancer risk. / Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Mayne, Susan Taylor; Owens, Patricia Hansen; Zhang, Bing; Boyle, Peter; Carter, Darryl; Ward, Barbara; Zhang, Yawei; Zahm, Shelia Hoar.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 151, No. 11, 01.06.2000, p. 1103-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zheng, T, Holford, TR, Mayne, ST, Owens, PH, Zhang, B, Boyle, P, Carter, D, Ward, B, Zhang, Y & Zahm, SH 2000, 'Exposure to electromagnetic fields from use of electric blankets and other in-home electrical appliances and breast cancer risk', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 151, no. 11, pp. 1103-1111.
Zheng, Tongzhang ; Holford, Theodore R. ; Mayne, Susan Taylor ; Owens, Patricia Hansen ; Zhang, Bing ; Boyle, Peter ; Carter, Darryl ; Ward, Barbara ; Zhang, Yawei ; Zahm, Shelia Hoar. / Exposure to electromagnetic fields from use of electric blankets and other in-home electrical appliances and breast cancer risk. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2000 ; Vol. 151, No. 11. pp. 1103-1111.
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