Exposure of rhesus monkeys to cowpox virus Brighton Red by large-particle aerosol droplets results in an upper respiratory tract disease

Reed F. Johnson, Dima A. Hammoud, Donna L. Perry, Jeffrey Solomon, Ian N. Moore, Matthew G. Lackemeyer, Jordan K. Bohannon, Philip J. Sayre, Mahnaz Minai, Amy B. Papaneri, Katie R. Hagen, Krisztina B. Janosko, Catherine Jett, Kurt Cooper, Joseph E. Blaney, Peter B. Jahrling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We previously demonstrated that small-particle (0.5 – 3.0 µm) aerosol infection of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with cowpox virus (CPXV)-Brighton Red (BR) results in fulminant respiratory tract disease characterized by severe lung parenchymal pathology but only limited systemic virus dissemination and limited classic epidermal pox-like lesion development (Johnson et al., 2015). Based on these results, and to further develop CPXV as an improved model of human smallpox, we evaluated a novel large-particle aerosol (7.0 – 9.0 µm) exposure of rhesus monkeys to CPXV- BR and monitored for respiratory tract disease by serial computed tomography (CT). As expected, the upper respiratory tract and large airways were the major sites of virus-induced pathology following large-particle aerosol exposure. Large-particle aerosol CPXV exposure of rhesus macaques resulted in severe upper airway and large airway pathology with limited systemic dissemination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number000501
Pages (from-to)1942-1954
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume97
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016

Keywords

  • Aerosol
  • Large-particle aerosol
  • Nonhuman primate model
  • Orthopoxvirus
  • Smallpox
  • Variola virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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