Exploring the relationship between preferences for high fat foods and efficacy of the ketogenic and modified Atkins diets among children with seizure disorders

Adrianna M Amari, Zahava Turner, James Rubenstein, Jonathan R. Miller, Eric H Kossoff

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Abstract

Purpose Previous research has indicated that children with seizures may prefer high fat foods - a preference compatible with ketogenic and modified Atkins dietary therapies. The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the relationship between fat preference and efficacy of therapeutic diets in treating intractable seizures among a pediatric population. Methods Preference for high fat foods was directly assessed in a sample of 30 children prior to commencing either the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet. Seizure control was assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months following diet initiation. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, correlations between fat preference and diet efficacy were examined at each follow-up and across the follow-up period. Results At individual follow-ups, correlations between fat preference and diet efficacy varied in terms of both strength and significance; however, modest, positive correlations with fat preference were significant when examining high levels of efficacy (100% seizure reduction, ≥90% seizure reduction) across a 1-year follow-up period. Conclusion These findings provide preliminary evidence that fat preference, when directly assessed, may be a useful predictor of treatment efficacy for the ketogenic and modified Atkins diets; however, further research is necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-177
Number of pages5
JournalSeizure
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Atkins diet
  • Children
  • Food preference
  • Ketogenic diet
  • Modified
  • Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

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