Exploring the need for hepatology nurses and allied health professionals in Victorian liver clinics.

Jonathon P. Ehsani, Trang Vu, Maria Karvelas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the need for hepatology nurses and allied health professionals in Victorian liver clinics to meet the increasing demand from people seeking treatment for hepatitis C infection. DESIGN: We reviewed the literature, analysed data from nine Victorian liver clinics, and conducted a qualitative rapid assessment with key stakeholders including hepatology nurses. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen key stakeholders including clinicians and directors of liver clinics were invited to take part in interviews; two declined to participate. All ten members of the Victorian Hepatology Nurses Group were invited to participate in a focus group discussion, and six attended. RESULTS: Participants reported that hepatology nurses played a critical role in improving treatment uptake and compliance, in particular, in educating, counselling and managing treatment for people with hepatitis C infection. Psychiatric and social work staff assisted patients to overcome side effects associated with treatment. Interpreters increased access for those from culturally and linguistically diverse communities. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatology nurses and allied health professionals are central to enhancing treatment outcomes for people who are infected with hepatitis C. Further research is necessary to estimate the number of nurses and allied health professionals required to meet the current and future needs of people receiving treatment for hepatitis C infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-218
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Volume30
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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