Exploring the diet and lifestyle changes contributing to weight gain among australian west african women following migration: A qualitative study

Olutoyin O.Babatunde Sowole, Tamara Power, Patricia Davidson, Charlotte Ballard, Debra Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims and objectives: This paper reports on women’s experiences of weight gain and obesity as they became acculturated to the Australian diet and lifestyle. Background: Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa have a much higher risk of obesity than the native population when settling in industrialised countries. Method: Qualitative. Results: Women in this study reported weight gain post-migration. This was attributed to increased access to a wide variety of food including takeaway food and more sedentary lifestyles. Conclusions: Obesity has long-term consequences for health and well-being. Further research is needed to support a healthy transition to life in Australia. Relevance to clinical practice: Gaining insight into the underlying reasons that West African immigrants to Australia become obese could contribute to assisting health professionals design culturally appropriate interventions and health education programmes to support new arrivals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-159
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Nurse
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 12 2018

Keywords

  • Migrant health
  • Obesity
  • Patient experience
  • Qualitative study
  • Women’s health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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