Exploring the Biological Basis of Hepatitis B e Antigen in Hepatitis B Virus Infection

David Milich, T. Jake Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The function of the hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) is largely unknown because it is not required for viral assembly, replication, or infection. In this report we chronicle clinical and experimental studies in an attempt to understand the role of HBeAg in natural infection. These studies largely have focused on clinical-pathologic features of HBeAg-negative variants in acute and chronic HBV infection, mutational analysis in animal models of hepadnavirus infection, and the use of transgenic murine models. The clinical and experimental data suggest that serum HBeAg may serve an immunoregulatory role in natural infection. To the contrary, cytosolic HBeAg serves as a target for the inflammatory immune response. These dual roles of the HBeAg and its ability to activate or tolerize T cells show the complexity of the interactions between the HBeAg and the host during HBV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1075-1086
Number of pages12
JournalHepatology
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis B e Antigens
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B virus
Infection
Hepadnaviridae
Virus Assembly
Animal Models
T-Lymphocytes
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Exploring the Biological Basis of Hepatitis B e Antigen in Hepatitis B Virus Infection. / Milich, David; Liang, T. Jake.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 38, No. 5, 11.2003, p. 1075-1086.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Milich, David ; Liang, T. Jake. / Exploring the Biological Basis of Hepatitis B e Antigen in Hepatitis B Virus Infection. In: Hepatology. 2003 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 1075-1086.
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