Exploring the association between emotional abuse and childhood borderline personality features: The moderating role of personality traits

Kim L. Gratz, Robert D. Latzman, Matthew T. Tull, Elizabeth Keats Reynolds, C. W. Lejuez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most of the extant literature on borderline personality disorder has focused on the course, consequences, and correlates of this disorder among adults. However, little is known about childhood borderline personality (BP) features, or the factors associated with the emergence of BP pathology in childhood. A greater understanding of childhood BP features and associated risk factors has important implications for the development of primary and secondary prevention programs. The goal of the present study was to examine the interrelationships among two BP-relevant traits (affective dysfunction and impulsivity), a BP-relevant environmental stressor (emotional abuse), and BP features in a sample of 225 children aged 11 to 14 years. Results provide support for the role of both trait vulnerabilities and environmental stressors in childhood BP features. Further, findings highlight the moderating role of affective dysfunction in the relationship between emotional abuse and childhood BP features.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-508
Number of pages16
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Personality
Borderline Personality Disorder
Impulsive Behavior
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Exploring the association between emotional abuse and childhood borderline personality features : The moderating role of personality traits. / Gratz, Kim L.; Latzman, Robert D.; Tull, Matthew T.; Reynolds, Elizabeth Keats; Lejuez, C. W.

In: Behavior Therapy, Vol. 42, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 493-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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