Exploring potential reasons for the temporal trend in dialysis-requiring AKI in the United States

Raymond K. Hsu, Charles E. McCulloch, Michael Heung, Rajiv Saran, Vahakn B. Shahinian, Meda E. Pavkov, Nilka Ríos Burrows, Neil R. Powe, Chi Yuan Hsu

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Abstract

Background and objectives The population incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI has risen substantially in the last decade in the United States, and factors associated with this temporal trend are not well known. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a United States nationally representative database of hospitalizations from 2007 to 2009. We used validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to identify hospitalizations with dialysis-requiring AKI and then, selected the diagnostic and procedure codes most highly associated with dialysis-requiring AKI in 2009. We applied multivariable logistic regression adjusting for demographics and used a backward selection technique to identify a set of diagnoses or a set of procedures that may be a driver for this changing risk in dialysis-requiring AKI. Results From 2007 to 2009, the population incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI increased by 11% per year (95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.16; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 7 2016
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation
  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Hsu, R. K., McCulloch, C. E., Heung, M., Saran, R., Shahinian, V. B., Pavkov, M. E., ... Hsu, C. Y. (2016). Exploring potential reasons for the temporal trend in dialysis-requiring AKI in the United States. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 11(1), 14-20. https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.04520415