Exploring differential impacts of interventions to reduce and prevent intimate partner violence (IPV) on sub-groups of women and men: A case study using impact evaluations from Rwanda and South Africa

Sangeeta Chatterji, Lori Heise, Andrew Gibbs, Kristin Dunkle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Currently, most efforts to evaluate programmes designed to reduce intimate partner violence (IPV) assume that they affect all people similarly. Understanding whether interventions are more or less effective for different subgroups of individuals, however, can yield important insights for programming. In this study, we conducted subgroup analyses to assess whether treatment effects vary by baseline reporting of IPV experience among women or perpetration among men. Results indicated that for both men and women, the Indashyikirwa intervention in Rwanda was more successful at reducing or stopping ongoing IPV than it was at preventing its onset. The SS-CF intervention in South Africa, by contrast, was more successful at preventing men from starting to perpetrate IPV than it was in reducing the intensity of men's perpetration or stopping it entirely. These results indicate that the prevention field needs to better understand the extent to which IPV interventions may have differential impacts on primary versus secondary prevention. It also emphasizes the importance of distinguishing between intervention strategies that prevent the onset of IPV versus those that reduce or stop ongoing IPV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100635
JournalSSM - Population Health
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Intimate partner violence
  • Measurement
  • Primary prevention
  • Rwanda
  • Secondary prevention
  • South Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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