Explaining Selective Spatial Breakdown in Williams Syndrome: Four Principles of Normal Spatial Development and Why They Matter

Barbara Landau, James E. Hoffman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter describes people with Williams syndrome (WS) - a rare genetic deficit caused by missing a handful of genes - that are severely impaired in carrying out a class of tasks commonly called " visual-spatial construction" tasks. It proposes an explanation of the spatial impairment in WS that depends heavily on the understanding of normal spatial development. It also offers four principles underlying the normal development of human spatial representations. Then, it discusses the three salient characteristics of the WS spatial profile and documents these characteristics with evidence from studies in the labs. It presents an explanation within normal spatial development for why the WS profile is the way it is. Furthermore, it explains the relationships among genes, brains, and minds and how they can account for the spatial profile of WS in the context of normal human spatial representation and its development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Emerging Spatial Mind
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199848096
ISBN (Print)9780195189223
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2012

Keywords

  • Brains
  • Genes
  • Human
  • Minds
  • Principles
  • Spatial development
  • Spatial impairment
  • Visual-spatial construction
  • Williams syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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