Explaining global network emergence and nonemergence: Comparing the processes of network formation for tuberculosis and pneumonia

Kathryn Quissell, David Berlan, Jeremy Shiffman, Gill Walt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increased attention is being paid to networks in public administration and development policy, yet there is limited understanding of how voluntary global networks form and why some of these networks cohere and emerge faster than others. Comparisons between the global networks for tuberculosis (TB) and pneumonia reveal processes of network formation relevant to other contexts. Though selected as most similar paired cases, their trajectories of network emergence diverged and TB's formed far earlier and more easily. By using a theoretic framework allowing for networks to be considered as outcomes of a policy process, this study reveals an iterative process of network emergence corresponding to the three streams model of issue attention. Successful emergence is based on building shared identities among policy entrepreneurs, agreeing on issue frames, creating institutions, developing relationships, sustaining latent networks during issue neglect, and linking to opportunities in the policy environment. Further, this study reveals that once formed, network structures enable access to political opportunities and more effective development policymaking and governance. Additionally, for networks struggling to take shape, we identify deliberate efforts that can overcome earlier iterations of failed attempts at network formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-153
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Administration and Development
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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pneumonia
tuberculosis
contagious disease
public administration
entrepreneur
trajectory
policy
development policy
neglect

Keywords

  • development policy
  • global networks
  • governance
  • policy process

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Explaining global network emergence and nonemergence : Comparing the processes of network formation for tuberculosis and pneumonia. / Quissell, Kathryn; Berlan, David; Shiffman, Jeremy; Walt, Gill.

In: Public Administration and Development, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.10.2018, p. 144-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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