Experimentally-induced spontaneous opiate withdrawal: Relationship to cigarette craving and expired air carbon monoxide

Michelle R. Lofwall, Sharon L. Walsh, George Bigelow, Eric C Strain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Smoking often increases after opioid use among those addicted to both opioids and nicotine, but the relationship between smoking and experimentally induced spontaneous opioid withdrawal (OW) has not been characterized. Six inpatient opioid-dependent smokers were stabilized on morphine 15 mg SC QID. Expired air carbon monoxide levels and smoking craving were measured for each participant on ten days when spontaneous OW was experimentally induced and on ten separate days in the absence of OW. Spontaneous OW was associated with significantly reduced carbon monoxide levels and smoking craving. Interestingly, craving was only reduced for items related to the positive reinforcing effects of smoking. These preliminary results suggest that OW may be a favorable context to initiate smoking cessation treatment interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-315
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Opiate Alkaloids
Carbon Monoxide
Tobacco Products
Opioid Analgesics
Air
Smoking
Withholding Treatment
Craving
Smoking Cessation
Nicotine
Morphine
Inpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Experimentally-induced spontaneous opiate withdrawal : Relationship to cigarette craving and expired air carbon monoxide. / Lofwall, Michelle R.; Walsh, Sharon L.; Bigelow, George; Strain, Eric C.

In: American Journal on Addictions, Vol. 16, No. 4, 07.2007, p. 310-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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